How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor

By Roger Waldinger; Michael I. Lichter | Go to book overview

Notes

1.
INTRODUCTION
1
As pointed out by Michael Walzer in What it means to be an American (New York: Marsilio, 1992), p. 24, building on an earlier observation by Horace Kallen, “The United States … has a peculiar anonymity. ” (cited in Walzer, p. 23).
2
See Roger Waldinger and Mehdi Bozorgmehr, eds., Ethnic Los Angeles (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1996), especially chapters 11, 12, 15; and Barry Edmonston and James P. Smith, The new Americans: economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration (Washington, D. C.: National Academy Press, 1997). The diversity of today's immigrant flows is a central theme sounded in Alejandro and Rubén G. Rumbaut Portes, Immigrant America, 2d ed. (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1996).
3
Immigrants make up 13 percent of all persons 25–64 years old, but over half of those possessing no more than an eighth-grade education, and 17 percent of those with some high school education (calculations from a merged sample of the 1994–97 Current Population Survey). For further background, see Roger Waldinger and Jennifer Lee, “New immigrants in urban America, ” in Strangers at the gates: new immigrants in urban America, ed. Roger Waldinger (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2001).
4
One of the most systematic formulations of this approach can be found in George Borjas, “Economic theory and international migration, ” International Migration Review 23, no. 3 (1989): 457–85.
5
Scholars advanced two distinct, though related, “mismatch” hypotheses. One emphasized skills, underscoring the lack of fit between urban employers and the proficiencies, as measured by years of education, of minority urban residents. The second, focusing on geography, underscored the dislocation that occurred as low-skilled jobs, once located in inner cities, gravitated to suburbs, which

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How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One - How the Other Half Works 1
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 3
  • Part Two - The Social Organization of Labor 29
  • Chapter 2 - What Employers Want 31
  • Chapter 3 - Doing the Job 42
  • Chapter 4 - The Language of Work 63
  • Part Three - From Market to Work 81
  • Chapter 5 - Network, Bureaucracy, and Exclusion 83
  • Chapter 6 - Social Capital and Social Closure 100
  • Chapter 7 - Bringing the Boss Back In 121
  • Part Four - Prejudice, Preferences, and Conflict 139
  • Chapter 8 - Whom Employers Want 141
  • Chapter 9 - Us and them 155
  • Chapter 10 - Diversity and Its Discontents 181
  • Part Five - Ethnicity at Work 203
  • Chapter 11 - Black/immigrant Competition 205
  • Chapter 12 - Conclusion 218
  • Appendix - The Local Context 235
  • Notes 253
  • Index 277
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