Reversible Destiny: Mafia, Antimafia, and the Struggle for Palermo

By Jane C. Schneider; Peter T. Schneider | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We were fortunate to reside in Palermo off and on between 1987 and 2000, while pursuing the research for this book. Numerous friends and colleagues took excellent care of us—helping us locate interesting places to live, mediating introductions to public figures, answering our interminable questions. Knowing of our desire to chart transformations in the relationship between mafia and antimafia in the Palermo region, many went out of their way to contribute. They suggested books and journals to read, alerted us to events and controversies of interest, invited us to meetings and discussion groups, and included us in the rounds of their everyday lives. Perhaps needless to say, people who assisted in these ways are concentrated on the antimafia side of the mafia-antimafia equation (although we have in the past also known mafiosi in rural Sicily). We particularly want to thank Ginni Albegiani, Orazio and Nina Barrese, Letizia Battaglia, Daniele Billiteri, Raimondo Catanzaro, Augusto Cavadi, Alessandro Cestelli, Marta Cimino, Gabriella Callari, Donatella Di Natoli, Giusi Ferrara, Renata Feruzza, Giuseppe and Vivi Fici, Giovanna Fiume, Gabriella Gribaudi, Angela Locanto, Salvatore Lupo, Rosario Mangiameli, Pasquale Marchese, Wanda Mollica, Franco and Rita Nicastro, Giovanni Oddo, Letizia Paoli, Anna Puglisi, Marina and Santi Rizzo, Sergio Russo, the late Giuliana Saladino, Umberto Santino, Cesare Scardula, Paola Sconzo, Cosimo Scordato, Mary Taylor Simeti, Paolo Viola, Emanuele Villa, and Francesco Vinci.

Letizia Paoli, Umberto Santino, Mary Taylor Simeti, and Paolo Viola

-xi-

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Reversible Destiny: Mafia, Antimafia, and the Struggle for Palermo
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - The Palermo Crucible 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Genesis of the Mafia 22
  • Chapter 3 - The Mafia and the Cold War 49
  • Chapter 4 - The Cultural Production of Violence 81
  • Chapter 5 - Seeking Causes, Casting Blame 103
  • Chapter 6 - Mysteries and Poisons 127
  • Chapter 7 - The Antimafia Movement 160
  • Chapter 8 - Backlash and Renewal 193
  • Chapter 9 - Civil Society Groundwork 216
  • Chapter 10 - Recuperating the Built Environment 235
  • Chapter 11 - Cultural Re-Education 260
  • Chapter 12 - Reversible Destiny 290
  • Notes 305
  • References 317
  • Index 331
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