Storm Warnings: Science Fiction Confronts the Future

By George E. Slusser; Colin Greenland et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

Storm Warnings and Dead Zones: Imagination and the Future
1. Ray Bradbury, The October Country ( New York: Ballantine Books, 1974), pp. 175-91.
2. Robert Scholes, Structuralism in Literature ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1974), p. 193.
3. Faustus's pact grants him power over nature for exactly twenty-four years. His search to conquer earth and heaven soon leads him to realize, however, that he has not world enough and time. To this anxiety Mephistopheles replies, ironically, that these heavens are not half so fair as man because they were made for man. For man, now damned to have a future, the old static, homocentric world, the vision that drove Faustus to rebel in the first place, is now evoked as a refuge, an ironic haven from the terrors of a human future which, despite promises, has the necessary limits of our condition.
4. Edward W. Said, "Abecedarium Culturae," in Modern French Criticism: From Proust and Valery to Structuralism, ed. John K. Simon ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972), P. 350. "In achieving a position of mastery over man, language has reduced him to a grammatical function." Said's analysis of Foucault and Lévi-Strauss is based on this adversarial relationship between man and system.
5. Scholes, p. 200. "The role of a properly structuralist imagination will of necessity be futuristic." He says elsewhere: "In the structuralist vision of man, a new awareness of the nature of language and the processes of thought has led to a new awareness of human universality" (p. 190).
6. Said, p. 531. "In other words, man now lives in a circle without a center, or in a maze without a way out."
7. Scholes, p. 199. He goes on, significantly, to discuss the fall in terms of Faustian power: "The fall of man is neither a myth from prehistory nor an

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