Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers

By John Walter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book has been many years in the research and writing and I have, in consequence, incurred a large number of obligations. Space does not allow me to acknowledge them all here, but they can be found in the footnotes to the volume. The research for this book has taken me to many libraries and archives. If I sometimes groaned as the trail led me on, the consistently friendly welcome and helpful service I received helped to ease the extra mile(s). I would like especially to thank the staff at the Essex Record Office — in particular, at Chelmsford Vic Gray, and later Ken Hall and Janet Smith and at Colchester Paul Coverley and Jane Bedford — who have provided unfailing support. I would also like to thank the staff at the Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Suffolk Record Offices, the British Library Manuscripts Room, Public Record Office, Cambridge University Library Manuscripts and Rare Books Rooms, Bodleian Library and the Albert Sloman Library at the University of Essex. At the Department of Historiography and Archives, English Province of the Society of Jesus, J. G. Holt, S. J. and Tom McCoog, S. J. helped me to locate important sources. The depth of analysis attempted in what follows would not have been possible without the advantage of the many excellent unpublished dissertations on early modern Essex; I would like to thank in particular Mark Byford, Bill Cliftlands, Robin Clifton, Frances Condick, James Davies, Nigel Goose and Richard Dean Smith. Local historians in both Essex and Suffolk have been generous in sharing their knowledge with me. I would like to thank in particular Gordon Blackwood, Peter Northeast, Lyn Boothman and Arthur Teece of the Long Melford Historical Research Group, Frank Grace and Janet Gyford, the historians respectively of early modern Ipswich and Witham. Drs Janet Cooper and Chris Thornton of the Victoria County History of Essex generously allowed me to consult their Colchester files. Fellow students of seventeenthcentury England helped with references. I would like to thank in

-viii-

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Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Past and Present Publications *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - The Event 11
  • 1. - An Event and Its History 13
  • 2. - The Attacks 31
  • Part 2 - Contextualising the Crowd 69
  • 3. - The Micro-Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 71
  • 4. - The High Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 115
  • Part 3 - The Confessional Crowd 159
  • 5. - The Attack on Ministers 161
  • 6. - The Attack on Catholics 201
  • Part 4 - Reading the Crowd 235
  • 7. - Cloth and Class 237
  • 8. - Anti-Popery and Popular Parliamentarianism 285
  • Conclusion 331
  • Index 353
  • Past and Present Publications 358
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