Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers

By John Walter | Go to book overview

8.
Anti-popery and popular
Parliamentarianism

Amid these events the trade of this City and the kingdom is stopping altogether. The ordinary course of all trade has been interrupted and those who obtain their daily food by the work of their hands alone are reduced to the limits of despair. These ignorant people, persuaded by those who profit from trouble, that these calamities proceed from the presence of the bishops and catholic lords in Parliament, have appeared more than once at the Houses of Parliament this week, and tumultuously demanded the exclusion of the bishops and of the catholic lords also, and that the goods of both shall be distributed for the relief of their present needs, otherwise they threaten orally and in writing that necessity will compell them to take more violent measures…

The Venetian Ambassador to the Doge and Senate, 14
February 1641[2]1

The Eastern Counties, Suffolk, Norfolk, and Cambridgeshire … were happily kept from the beginning without any great combustion, though it were certain that many of the chief Gentry in those counties, bended in their affections to the King's Commission of Array: but they were not a part strong enough to engage their Countries in a War: For the Free-holders and Yeomen in general adhered to the Parliament: and those Gentlemen who attempted to raise men, or draw Forces together, or provide Arms for the King were soon curbed, and all their endeavours crushed at the beginning by those of the other side.

Thomas May, The History of the Parliament of England which began on November the 3rd MDCXL (1647)2

____________________
1
CSPV1640–1642, p. 291 (text in italics originally in cypher).
2
Bk 2, ch. 6, p. 108.

-285-

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Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Past and Present Publications *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - The Event 11
  • 1. - An Event and Its History 13
  • 2. - The Attacks 31
  • Part 2 - Contextualising the Crowd 69
  • 3. - The Micro-Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 71
  • 4. - The High Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 115
  • Part 3 - The Confessional Crowd 159
  • 5. - The Attack on Ministers 161
  • 6. - The Attack on Catholics 201
  • Part 4 - Reading the Crowd 235
  • 7. - Cloth and Class 237
  • 8. - Anti-Popery and Popular Parliamentarianism 285
  • Conclusion 331
  • Index 353
  • Past and Present Publications 358
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