Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers

By John Walter | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Coming to Colchester they there found a body of 5 or 6 thousand men, who upon their telling of them how displeasing the rifling and pillaging of Sir John Lucas his howse was to the Parliament they expressed much sorrow for what they had done, and said that they would bee willing to obey the Parliament, conceiving that what they had done had been grounded upon an order of Parliament and therefore if the Parliament were safe it was as much as they desired and that they did thereupon disperse themselves and made restitution of divers of those goods they had taken.

Sir Thomas Barrington's report to the House of
Commons, 24 August 16421

The Enemie being possest of the house [of Sir John Lucas], exercis'd their brutall rage upon the bare Walls for there was nothing else that remain'd, this being one of the first houses in England which suffred by that fatall libertie of the subiect, which the prophane Vulgar in the beginninge of these disorders soe passionately petition'd the Parliament to graunt them; who (intending to serve themselves of their blind furie, not only suffred, but applauded their violence to their neighbours, but like unskilful Conjurers they often raised those Spirits which they could [not] lay, for under cover of zeale to the cause the poor level'd the Riche of both parties.

Royalist account of the siege of Colchester 16482

____________________
1
BL, Harleian MS 163, fol. 307v–8r.
2
Beaufort House, Gloucestershire, MS Duke of Gloucester. I am grateful to Margaret Richards, the archivist, for making it possible for me to see a copy of this document.

-331-

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Understanding Popular Violence in the English Revolution: The Colchester Plunderers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Past and Present Publications *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Abbreviations x
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - The Event 11
  • 1. - An Event and Its History 13
  • 2. - The Attacks 31
  • Part 2 - Contextualising the Crowd 69
  • 3. - The Micro-Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 71
  • 4. - The High Politics of the Attack on Sir John Lucas 115
  • Part 3 - The Confessional Crowd 159
  • 5. - The Attack on Ministers 161
  • 6. - The Attack on Catholics 201
  • Part 4 - Reading the Crowd 235
  • 7. - Cloth and Class 237
  • 8. - Anti-Popery and Popular Parliamentarianism 285
  • Conclusion 331
  • Index 353
  • Past and Present Publications 358
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