Turbulent Decade: A History of the Cultural Revolution

By Yan Jiaqi; Gao Gao et al. | Go to book overview
Contents
Translator's Preface D. W Y Kwokxi
Acknowledgments xix
Preface to the Revised Edition Yan Jiaqi and Gao Gaoxxi
Preface to the First Edition Gao Gaoxxiii
Introduction: The Genesis of the Cultural Revolution 1
PART ONE: The "Need for More Personality Cult" 9
CHAPTER 1: Criticizing Hai Rui Dismissed from Office23
Wu Han and Hai Rui Dismissed / Publication of Yao Wenyuan's Article / Two Armies Opposed / The February Outline / Beginnings of the Cultural Revolution / The Ill Fate of the Principals of "Three-Family Village" / Formation of the Central Cultural Revolution Small Group
CHAPTER 2: The Struggle around the Question of the Work Groups 39
A Big-Character Poster at Beijing University / Garrisoning the Work Groups / Raising the Anti-Work Groups Tide / Beginnings of the Anti-Interference Movement / Creating Greater Opposition to the Work Groups / The Contradiction between Mao Zedong and Liu Shaoqi Goes Public
CHAPTER 3: The Rise of the Red Guards and the Cult of the Individual 56
The Birth of the Red Guards / Mao Zedong's Support for the Red Guards Movement / Whipping Up the Craze of Worship / Source of the Four Greats
CHAPTER 4: "Declaring War on the Old World" 65
Building an "Extraordinarily Revolutionized World" / "Destroy the Four Olds" Goes Nationwide / A Revolution Aimed at Culture / The Mania of Confiscating Homes and Property / "Red Terror" / Going against Civilization
CHAPTER 5: Nationwide Networking 85
Going to the Capital for Networking / "Up North, Down South, March East, Advance West" / A "Red Sea" / "A Long March Expedition" Networking on Foot

-v-

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