Turbulent Decade: A History of the Cultural Revolution

By Yan Jiaqi; Gao Gao et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 14

The Frenzy of False
Accusations and
Persecutions

THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION was a time of abrupt changes in the power relations of the Chinese polity. These changes trampled the constitution and the laws of China. To fortify their positions and gain ever more power, Mao Zedong, Lin Biao, and the members of the Central Small Group used the heat of the Cultural Revolution to unleash a frenzy of false accusations and persecutions. From the Central to the regions, Mao believed that there was an organized "Headquarters of Capitalism" and that to topple this headquarters, Liu Shaoqi, Deng Xiaoping, Tao Zhu, Peng Zhen, Luo Ruiqing, Lu Dingyi, and Yang Shangkun had to be overthrown along with other members of this command post. Others in disagreement with Mao Zedong and Lin Biao, especially the latter, and those who were not in enthusiastic agreement with the enactment of the Cultural Revolution, such as Marshals He Long, Peng Dehuai, Zhu De, Ye Jianying, and Chen Yi, also met with false accusations and persecution. In this frenzy of unconstitutional and illegal acts, they lost all power, authority, and guarantees of life and liberty.


Framing and Tormenting He Long

He Long and Lin Biao were given the title of "marshal" in 1955. Even though He Long and his wife knew Lin Biao and Ye Qun over the years, they had not really seen eye to eye on matters.

As early as the War of Resistance against Japan, Ye Qun was a broadcaster at a station controlled by the Guomindang in Nanjing. She knew the Guomindang figures and even participated in a C. C. Clique 1 student debate on the Three People's Principles, taking a first. She was also connected with an outer C. C. Clique circle organization called "Combat" (Zhandou). For these reasons, the Communist underground sent Xue Ming, wife of He Long, to talk to her formally, and Ye Qun said she "would reconsider the road to take from now on."

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