Fixing African Economies: Policy Research for Development

By Lucie Colvin Phillips; Diery Seck | Go to book overview

1
Fixing African Economies:
The Research-Policy Nexus
Lucie Colvin Phillips and Diery Seck

When African countries embarked on the first round of structural adjustment of their economies in the 1980s and 1990s, there was little opportunity for research on what policies would work and where. The governments were generally bankrupt, and the statist economies had experienced economic stagnation or even decline for several decades. So the first round of structural adjustment policies were generally imposed by international financial institutions and based on theoretical models. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) stressed balancing government budgets, and the World Bank sought to guide the process of institutional reform. The reform process has been eventful and the record checkered. There is, nevertheless, now a consensus among African policymakers that a market economy is a legitimate goal. The challenges are to make such economies work and to alleviate poverty in the process. To that end, researchers throughout Africa have conducted some very interesting research in the last decade, the results of which are reflected in the chapters of this book. These chapters show that a new type of research is emerging in Africa, called policy research. This research evolves a new partnership between researchers (expatriate and national) and stakeholders in each of the countries. It seeks homegrown solutions that take account of local institutions and political economy, and it is conducted and discussed in public, unlike much purely academic research.


The Research-Policy Nexus:
The Role of Research in Economic Policymaking

Understanding the nexus between research and economic policymaking does not require an intricate knowledge of the economic challenges faced

-1-

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Fixing African Economies: Policy Research for Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - Fixing African Economies: the Research-Policy Nexus 1
  • Notes *
  • 2 - Ghana: Promoting Accountability and Transparency in Government Behavior 25
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Nigeria: Understanding Attitudes Toward Democracy and Markets 65
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Kenya: Policy Research and Policy Reform 95
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Tanzania: Policy Research and the Mining Boom 117
  • 6 - Madagascar: Using Policy Research in Formulating Tax Policy 129
  • Appendix - Other Recent Tax Policy Research in Madagascar *
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Ghana and Uganda: Considering Monetary and Exchange Rate Policies 155
  • Notes *
  • 8 - South Africa: Policy-Oriented Research on Labor Markets and Poverty 183
  • 9 - Conclusions 209
  • Acronyms 227
  • References 229
  • The Contributors 237
  • Index 243
  • About the Book 249
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