Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions

By Georges-Franck Pinard; Linda Pagani | Go to book overview

10
Parricide
CHARLES P. EWING

As a boy, L. assaulted a hitchhiker and then urinated on him. As an adult, the 200-pound, alcohol and drug abuser routinely carried a pistol, stabbed and shot at his father, and terrorized his neighbors. For years, L. beat his wife. When she finally left him, he convinced a court to give him custody of their four children

For the next four years, L. kept the children in an isolated trailer with no electricity, no phone, and no running water, allowing them out only to go to school. Inside the mobile home, L. beat the children with rubber hoses and two-by-fours, and punched, slapped, and kicked them. While drunk he would line the children up against the wall and ring their heads with gunfire.

L.'s reign of terror ended when his two older children, sons 15 and 12, shot him in the head with a deer rifle while he slept. Criminal charges against both boys were ultimately dismissed.

Sixteen-year-old J. had never been in trouble. An above-average student and member of the high school swim team, he was a Boy Scout and active member of his church. At the same time, however, J. was suffering from major depression, a learning disability, and chronic feelings of inferiority. After receiving disappointing scores on college admission tests and an “F” on a Spanish quiz, J. snapped.

Initially intent upon killing himself, J. instead turned his rage outward and used the family's .22-caliber rifle to shoot and kill both his parents. Charged with murder, J. was found not guilty by reason of insanity.

G. had been in trouble on and off since he was 6, when he started riding his bicycle in front of cars and throwing objects at passing drivers. By age 11, he was banned from most nearby stores because of his shoplift-

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Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Prologue ix
  • References xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: an Overview of the Literature *
  • References *
  • Basic Issues in Violence Research 23
  • 2 - Biology, Development, and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 3 - The Development of Physical Aggression During Childhood and the Prediction of Later Dangerousness 47
  • References *
  • 4 - Predicting Adult Official and Self-Reported Violence 66
  • References *
  • Mental Health Issues and Dangerousness 89
  • 5 - Major Mental Disorder and Violence: Epidemiology and Risk Assessment *
  • References 100
  • 6 - Axis II Disorders and Dangerousness 103
  • References *
  • 7 - Recidivistic Violent Behavior and Axis I and Axis II Disorders 121
  • References *
  • Family Issues and Dangerousness 136
  • 8 - Risk Assessment for Intimate Partner Homicide *
  • References *
  • 9 - Parents at Risk of Filicide 158
  • References *
  • 10 - Parricide 181
  • References 194
  • Individual Characteristics and Dangerousness 195
  • 11 - Alcohol and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 12 - Violence and Substance Abuse 216
  • References *
  • 13 - Threats, Stalking, and Criminal Harassment 238
  • References *
  • Conclusion 258
  • 14 - Discussion and Clinical Commentary on Issues in the Assessment and Prediction of Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • Index 279
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