Toward Normalizing U.S.--Korea Relations: In Due Course?

By Edward A. Olsen | Go to book overview

PREFACE

CONSIDERING HOW TO IMPROVE U. S. POLICY TOWARD THE long-divided Korean nation and the evolving relationship between the two Korean states, this book explores counterintuitive alternatives to and advocates fundamental changes in existing U. S. policy toward both North and South Korea. My analysis draws upon libertarian strategic traditions, 1 as well as other liberal and conservative positions on U. S. strategic independence. 2 The emphasis is on assessing where—and why—U. S. policy toward Korea went astray and on recommending appropriate means to put it back on a proper track, one that will best serve U. S. national interests.

Although this book focuses on circumstances in Korea, its underlying premise is how to rectify a long-term problem with U. S. foreign policy. Throughout the Cold War and post—Cold War years, the United States has been enmeshed in diverse strategic engagements that contribute to U. S. interventionist policies worldwide. The situation in Korea is just one major example of an excessive and unnecessary commitment on the part of the United States. Although U. S. and Korean citizens have become accustomed to a certain level of entanglement, there are viable alternative means for preserving peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula that do not require such a degree of U. S. involvement. As important as these alternatives should be for rectifying flaws in U. S. grand strategy, they also are important to Koreans as a catalyst for normalizing U. S.-Korean relations and seeking national reconciliation in an international environment conducive to regional equilibrium centered on a stable Korean Peninsula. Such alternatives can serve the national interests of both the United States and the entire Korean nation—South Korea, North Korea, and a future United Korea.

-ix-

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Toward Normalizing U.S.--Korea Relations: In Due Course?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes x
  • 1 - In Due Course: a Vague Paradigm 1
  • Notes *
  • 2 - Tracing U. S.-Korea Abnormality 7
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Reinvigorating “due Course” in the Post—cold War Era 39
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Asia's Role in Shaping Korea's “due Course” 81
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Implementing a New U. S. Policy 105
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Conclusion: How? When? 137
  • Selected Bibliography 139
  • Index 143
  • About the Book 148
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