A History of Women's Writing in Russia

By Adele Marie Barker; Jehanne M. Gheith | Go to book overview

Notes on contributors

OLGA BAKICH is Senior Tutor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Toronto. She is the editor of the Russian language literary and historical journal Rossiiane v Azii. She has written several articles on the history of the Russian community in Harbin and is compiling a forthcoming bibliography Harbin Russian Imprints: Bibliography as History, 1898–1963.

ADELE MARIE BARKER is Professor of Russian and Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of The Mother Syndrome in the Russian Folk Imagination (1986), co-author with Susan Hardy Aiken, Maya Koreneva, and Ekaterina Stetsenko of Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges between (ex-) Soviet and American Women (1994), and editor of Consuming Russia: Popular Culture, Sex, and Society Since Gorbachev (1999).

CATHERINE CIEPIELA is Associate Professor of Russian at Amherst College. She has published on Tsvetaeva, Bakhtin, Zhukovsky, and Pasternak, and is the author of a forthcoming book entitled The Same Solitude: Boris Pasternak and Marina Tsvetaeva.

JEHANNE M GHEITH is Associate Professor of Russian Literature and Women's Studies at Duke University. She is the author of Finding the Middle Ground: Krestovskii, Tur and the Power of Ambivalence in NineteenthCentury Women's Prose (forthcoming), and co-editor with Barbara Norton of An Improper Profession: Women, Gender, and Journalism in Late Imperial Russia (2001) and with Robin Bisha, Christine Holden, and William Wagner of Russian Women 1698–1917: Experience and Expression. An Anthology

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