A History of Women's Writing in Russia

By Adele Marie Barker; Jehanne M. Gheith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The editors wish to thank the Duke University Arts and Sciences Council, Duke Women's Studies, and at the University of Arizona, the Dean's Office of the College of Humanities, and the Department of Women's Studies for the support and time we needed in order to work on this volume. Our thanks also to Robin Bisha and to Peter Maggs for invaluable technical assistance above and beyond the call of duty. Our friends Julia Clancy-Smith and Carl Smith ran interference for us from a continent and an ocean away. And our contributors to this volume showed uncommonly good cheer and patience in putting up with seemingly endless delays, editing, cutting, and last minute queries. They were models for collaboration. And to our friends and family — Susan Aiken, Barbara Andrade, Al Babbitt, Noah Barker, Chris Carroll, Richard Eaton, Dorothy Gheith, Mohamed and Aida Gheith, Georgia and Katherine Maas, Ron, Barbara and Megan MacLean, Eileen Meehan, David Need, Barbara Norton, and Del and Lafon Phillips–we can finally say “we are finished!”

In closing, we would like to thank two unlikely contributors to this volume: Coach K. of the Duke Blue Devils and Coach Olsen of the Arizona Wildcats. To both of you, “You may never have expected to be the motivating force behind A History of Women's Writing in Russia. ” Over the years the two editors of this volume have shared an intense love of basketball, rooting for two teams that became national rivals for the NCAA Men's Championship as we were putting the finishing touches on this book in March, 2001. We celebrated the first submission of this manuscript by standing under the basket at Cameron. And we have cheered and mourned for these two teams, clutching at the buzzer, arguing with the officiating, and wondering what we would do when basketball season was over. This rivalry nurtured our friendship as it nurtured this book.

-xiii-

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