A History of Women's Writing in Russia

By Adele Marie Barker; Jehanne M. Gheith | Go to book overview

10
Women and gender in post-symbolist
poetry and the Stalin era
KATHARINE HODGSON

The idea that women had a significant and specifically feminine contribution to make to Russian poetry was a recurring theme among early twentieth-century literary critics. One of the most striking claims came from Nadezhda L'vova, a poet herself, who predicted that “the twentieth century will probably be known to history as the 'women's century,' the century which saw the awakening of woman's creative selfawareness. ” Indeed, by about 1910 women poets had begun to win recognition from both readers and reviewers on an unprecedented scale. The early 1920s in particular were a time of considerable achievement and promise. Women who had already established their reputations before the 1917 October Revolution were publishing some of their best work, and had been joined by talented newcomers. Judging by the amount and quality of poetry by women being published towards the end of the 1920s, however, things were starting to look rather different. Some women had stopped writing poetry altogether, and turned to other fields such as journalism or translation. Some had emigrated. Many found that they were no longer able to publish their work, and fell silent, or wrote “for the desk drawer. ” Almost a quarter of a century later, at the time of Stalin's death in 1953, few of the women who had emerged onto the scene before the late 1920s had managed to publish significant amounts of their work in the Soviet Union. A younger generation who had begun their careers in the late 1920s or early 1930s found themselves hemmed in by censorship and the demands of Socialist Realism. Since 1953, however, and especially since 1988, unpublished poetry written during the Stalin era has gradually come to light, and poets who had fallen into obscurity have been rediscovered. The picture that emerges is one of considerable achievement by women writing poetry in Russia.

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Women's Writing in Russia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 391

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.