Europe's New Security Challenges

By Heinz Gärtner; Adrian Hyde-Price et al. | Go to book overview

9
Strengthening Europe'S Security
Architecture: Where Do We Stand?
Where Should We Go?
HEIKO BORCHERT

Recent experience permits us to form a more concrete picture of how Europe'S security architecture will look in the next century. The most important steps have included the opening of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization through the Partnership for Peace (PfP) program, the signing of political charters with Russia and Ukraine, the entry of three new members, the Allianceled military operations in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo, and the decision to enlarge the European Union. Most recently, we have seen the rapprochement between NATO and the EU, the latter'S decision to integrate the Western European Union (WEU) and to be more actively involved in the so-called Petersberg tasks, and—finally—the agreement to create a Union of Freedom, Security, and Justice by integrating the Schengen and Dublin agreements into community law.

Against the background of these important developments, in this chapter I attempt to answer two basic questions: What are the central pillars of Europe'S security architecture? and How do Europe'S security organizations contribute to the strengthening of these pillars? I will concentrate on the second question and indicate what remains to be done in order to solidify Europe'S current architecture.

I argue that the European security architecture, comprising the transatlantic community, the Central and Eastern European (CEE) states, and Russia and Ukraine, has to be multilateral in character, that is, it has to be built on a set of rules facilitating and strengthening cooperation. Multilateralism implies equal treatment of all actors (indivisibility) and the general applicability (nondiscrimination) of liberal norms. 1 Actors will therefore build up positive expectations favoring international cooperation and allowing them to overcome the security dilemma. 2 However, multilateralism has two potential

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