Olympic Dreams: The Impact of Mega-Events on Local Politics

By Matthew J. Burbank; Gregory D. Andranovich et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project began as a series of questions about the relationship between cities and the Olympic games. Over a period of four years it evolved into a book about U. S. cities and their Olympic dreams. Along the way we were lucky enough to receive the assistance of many people who shared our interest in telling this story.

We would like to thank the many individuals who helped with different aspects of our research and writing. Mike Gorrell, Robert Huefner, and Ted Wilson each read the chapter on Salt Lake City and provided helpful comments. Dan Jones generously provided access to his unparalleled archive of public opinion data on Utah. Bert Granberg, director of the DIGIT Lab at the University of Utah, provided the necessary assistance and Phoebe McNeally supplied the expertise and patience to make the maps for each city. Doug McGee helped with expert research assistance in the early stage of this project. The staff at the Marriott Library, and especially Special Collections, provided help on many occasions. Thanks also are due to Frank Bell, Chris Bellavita, John Francis, Jim Gosling, Ted Hebert, Susan Olson, Steve Ott, Lisa Riley Roche, Linda Sillitoe, and Maria Titze for help with various aspects of the project. In Los Angeles, the staff at the Amateur Athletic Foundation of Los Angeles, especially Wayne Wilson and Shirley Ito, provided invaluable assistance while sharing the Paul Ziffren Sports Resource Center's Olympic Collection archives. The staff of the UCLA Research Library's Special Collections Department provided assistance with documents early in the project. The thirty-nine students in Political Science 404 at California State University, Los Angeles, during winter quarter

-xi-

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Olympic Dreams: The Impact of Mega-Events on Local Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Explorations in Publicpolicy *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Olympic Dreams 1
  • 2 - Economic Growth and Local Politics 11
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Mega-Events and Economic Development 33
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Los Angeles and the 1984 Summer Games 53
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Atlanta and the 1996 Summer Games 81
  • 6 - Salt Lake City and the 2002 Winter Games 121
  • Notes 155
  • 7 - Reading the Olympic Games 157
  • Notes *
  • Acronyms 173
  • References 175
  • Index 195
  • About the Book 203
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