The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity

By Kathy L. Gaca | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
Conclusion
The Demise of Greek Eros and Reproduction

Paul's ideas about sexual morality and social change were as revolutionary in their formulation as those of Plato, the Pythagoreans, and the early Stoics. In the first century c.e. there was no reason to think that his vision of driving fornication from Gentile lands would take hold with any greater success than Plato's socialist ideals of civic moderation and justice, the Pythagoreans' eugenic aims to improve moral character through procreationism, and the early Stoics' plans to train citizens to achieve right reason and action through mutually friendly and communal sexual eros.

Paul in his mission issues a universal and Christ-centered version of the Septuagintal imperative against the fornicating mores of the Canaanites and rebellious Israelites. Human sexual and reproductive mores must be devoted strictly to the biblical God through virginity or paired marriage in the body of Christ. This pattern of sexual devotion provides the only permissible basis of social order, for all of humanity, Gentile as well as Jew, is Israel and as such must serve God alone. Paul consequently insists that Christians of Gentile backgrounds, and Greeks first of all, must cease from dedicating any aspect of their minds or sexual bodies to their former gods. He vilifies the Gentiles' sexual heritage as wicked and deadly fornication against God, and portrays his new order of virginity or marriage in the Lord as the sole path to salvation and immortality.

In Romans 1:18–32 Paul stakes out a new position of major import for Christian sexual morality. A nebulous group of polytheistic peoples, Paul asserts, once recognized yet later abandoned God, on the model of rebellious Israel as portrayed by the Prophets. Though this apostate branch of Gentile Israel existed only in his fervid imagination, to him and his early patristic supporters this renegade culture was real, exclusively or primarily Greek, and needed to be redeemed from her affliction of God's venereal wrath.

-292-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 359

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.