Mexico's Mandarins: Crafting a Power Elite for the Twenty-First Century

By Roderic Ai Camp | Go to book overview

5
Origins of Socialization
Sources among the Power Elite

From 1970 through 2000, Mexico has witnessed exceptional alterations in social, economic, and political attitudes; it has been perhaps the most dynamic period since the revolutionary decades from 1910 through 1929. It is important, therefore, to explain how that shift came about, what it involved, and what socializing sources were most responsible for crafting fresh attitudes among power elite members.

In the previous two chapters, I examined the networking characteristics of Mexican power elites, arguing that mentors play a crucial role in creating and recruiting power elites and in generating networking ties to each other. The way in which power elites establish friendships, and the means through which they potentially influence the allocation of resources and leadership values through networking, is an essential part of their structure and behavior.

Many of the same sources which are essential to networking among power elites are crucial to the development of their attitudes and ideologies. In other words, sources such as family, career, and education also significantly influence the formation of power elite values. Most circumstantial literature suggests that elites, as a consequence of their shared status, view numerous issues in the same light. Most empirical studies, however, conclude that elites are as diverse in their views as is the general population.1

This book does not argue that Mexican power elites share similar attitudes within each group or across all groups. It does suggest that leadership

____________________
1
For example, Michael Useem, who researched leading American capitalists, concluded that they “were not found to have a political ideology more homogeneous than the remainder of the capitalist class. ” “The Inner Group of the American Capitalist Class, ” Social Problems, 25 (1978), 237.

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mexico's Mandarins: Crafting a Power Elite for the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.