Inventing the Criminal: A History of German Criminology, 1880-1945

By Richard F. Wetzell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR

CRIMINAL SOCIOLOGY IN THE WEIMAR YEARS

German criminology during the Weimar Republic was shaped by two opposing developments. On the one hand, the experience of the First World War and the accompanying surge in crime provided a powerful argument for the importance of the social causes of crime. On the other hand, the Weimar years saw an enormous increase in psychiatric research on criminal behavior that presented a strong case for biological explanations of crime. This chapter will examine the major studies of wartime crime and the development of a criminal sociology that elevated research on the social causes of crime to a new level of sophistication. The chapter's conclusion will provide a brief survey of the impact of criminological research on public attitudes, judicial practice, and penal reform under the Weimar Republic. The development of psychiatric research in what came to be known as "criminal biology" during the Weimar years forms the subject of the next chapter.

The most striking aspect of the development of the sociological study of crime in Germany before the Second World War is the virtual absence of sociologists or other social scientists working on the subject. The Handwörterbuch der Soziologie (Handbook of sociology), published in 1931, contained entries on a wide range of social phenomena from "the proletariat" to "the modern family" to "music," but nothing on crime. The prominent sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies was an exception. In 1895 he had published a brief article on "crime as a social phenomenon," in which he called for empirical research on professional criminals (Gauner). But he seems to have been unable to interest many of his students in the subject, and his own studies on crime in Schleswig-Holstein were minor contributions that did not significantly advance the field. 1. Since sociolo‐

____________________
1.
Alfred Vierkandt, ed., Handwörterbuch der Soziologie (Stuttgart: Enke, 1931). The Handwörterbuch contained a highly theoretical entry on the "sociology of law," which briefly

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inventing the Criminal: A History of German Criminology, 1880-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.