Recruiting Youth in the College Market: Current Practices and Future Policy Options

By M. Rebecca Kilburn; Beth J. Asch | Go to book overview

Chapter One

INTRODUCTION: TRENDS AND THEORETICAL
CONSIDERATIONS

M. Rebecca Kilburn

Beth J. Asch

Enlisted recruiting has been difficult in recent years. In fiscal year (FY) 1999, the Army missed its recruiting target—as did the Air Force, the service long regarded as immune to recruiting difficulties. Although all the services achieved their target in FY 2000, the percentage of high-quality recruits 1 declined to its lowest level in over a decade. In part, these recent problems reflected the effects on recruiting of the unusually strong labor market and robust economic conditions. To respond to such business cycle fluctuations, the military has typically relied on such policies as higher expenditures on advertising, an increased number of recruiters, and enlistment incentives. While these policies will continue to be critical in counteracting short-term cyclical fluctuations, it is important to recognize that additional policies may be needed to respond to long-term trends. The research reported in this document informs the development of new policies that respond to two long-term trends. The first of these trends is the huge growth in college attendance in recent years. The second is the continuing growth in the use of information technology in the military and the demand for high-quality recruits. As discussed below, both trends point to the value of recruiting youth in the college market. By youth in the college market we mean high school youth who plan to go to college soon after completing high school, youth who are already in college, or youth who

____________________
1
High-quality recruits are those who have completed high school and scored in the upper 50 percent on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT).

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recruiting Youth in the College Market: Current Practices and Future Policy Options
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.