Recruiting Youth in the College Market: Current Practices and Future Policy Options

By M. Rebecca Kilburn; Beth J. Asch | Go to book overview

Chapter Four

THE ENLISTMENT POTENTIAL
OF COLLEGE STUDENTS

Beth J. Asch

M. Rebecca Kilburn


INTRODUCTION

Recruiters traditionally attempt to meet their mission by targeting youth who plan to graduate from high school but have no immediate plans to attend college. As discussed in Chapter One, this group has not grown in the last two decades whereas the number of young people attending college right after high school has been rising steadily. This chapter explores whether college-bound youth are likely to be a promising pool of recruits and provides information to the services that will enable them to develop policies to tap this market. Given current recruiting shortfalls, now is an especially opportune time to identify new ways to expand the recruiting market.

The college market includes not only individuals who are attending college, but also seniors who plan to attend college in the future and former college students, such as dropouts and graduates. In addition, these different types of students may be tied to several types of post‐ secondary institutions including certificate or vocational programs, two-year colleges, 1 or four-year colleges. The research summarized in this chapter addresses the question of which of these segments of the college market might be the best to target for enlistment. We assess the enlistment potential of the various groups by examining

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1
We use the terms "two-year college" and "community college" interchangeably.

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