Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment

By Michael Vorenberg | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Manuscript Collections

Albany Institute of Art and History, Albany, New York

Erastus Corning papers

Bowdoin College, Special Collections, New Brunswick, Maine

Fessenden family papers

Butler Library, Columbia University, New York, New York

August Belmont papers John A. Dix papers Sydney Howard Gay papers

Chicago Historical Society, Chicago, Illinois

Isaac N. Arnold papers William Butler papers David Davis papers Stephen Douglas papers Zebina Eastman papers William Weston Patton papers Logan Uriah Reavis papers George Schneider papers

Cincinnati Historical Society, Cincinnati, Ohio

Murat Halstead papers Alexander Long papers William Lough papers Caleb B. Smith papers Isaac Strohm papers

Delaware Hall of Records, Dover, Delaware

Executive papers Samuel Townsend collection

Eleutherian Mills Historical Library, Wilmington, Delaware

Samuel Francis DuPont papers

-253-

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Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Slavery's Constitution 8
  • 2 - Freedom's Constitution 36
  • 3 - Facing Freedom 61
  • 4 - Debating Freedom 89
  • 5 - The Key Note of Freedom 115
  • 6 - The War Within a War: Emancipation and the Election of 1864 141
  • 7 - A King's Cure 176
  • 8 - The Contested Legacy of Constitutional Freedom 211
  • Appendix: Votes on Antislavery Amendment 251
  • Bibliography 253
  • Index 297
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