Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment

By Michael Vorenberg | Go to book overview

Index
abolitionists: in National Union party (1864), 122–5; petitions of, 12, 38–40, 61–2; in Radical Democratic party, 119–21, 126; view of Constitution, 11–14; view of Thirteenth Amendment, 81
Ackerman, Bruce, 54
Adams, Charles Francis, 20, 59
Adams, John Quincy, 12, 15, 51
African Americans: Confederate recruitment policy for, 185; efforts to gain equal rights, 81–4, 103; efforts to gain freedom, 23–4, 80–1, 103, 246; efforts to gain voting rights, 84–6, 119, 188– 9; land for, 84, 120–1, 179, 190; military service in Civil War, 37–8, 82; national convention (1864), 158–9; at National Union party convention, 124; observe passage of Thirteenth Amendment, 205, 207; rights under Freedmen's Bureau Act of 1866 and Civil Rights Act of 1866, 233–9; rights under Thirteenth Amendment, 55–6, 99– 107, 130–3, 186–91, 216–22; role in emancipation policy making, 79–81, 103, 131, 188–9; status in the North, 82; Union recruitment policy for, 27–8; view of Thirteenth Amendment, 61, 81–8, 244–6; see also citizenship; civil rights; colonization; equality; voting rights
Alabama: ratification debate on Thirteenth Amendment, 231
Alley, John B., 198
American Anti-Slavery Society, 125
Anthony, Henry B., 90
Anthony, Susan B., 38
Antietam (battle), 37
anti-Puritanism, 95–6
antislavery amendment: see Thirteenth Amendment
apprenticeship, 47, 174, 230, 239
Arnold, Isaac N., 48, 59, 70–1, 91–2, 131
Ashley, James M., 242; in election of 1864, 141, 151, 171; reconstruction legislation of, 49–50, 128–9, 190, 226; on Thirteenth Amendment, 49–51, 53, 139, 141, 171, 179–80, 199, 204–6
Atlanta, 154, 155, 179
Augusta, A. T., 83
Bancroft, George, 51n, 203, 226
Banks, Nathaniel P., 34
Barlow, Samuel L. M., 78–9, 179, 183–4
Barnett, T. J., 120
Bates, Edward, 40, 56, 68, 179
Battery Wagner, 37
Bayard, Thomas F., 167
Belz, Herman, 49
Benedict, Michael Les, 49, 138n
Bennett, James Gordon, 77, 86, 233; on black suffrage in Montana territory, 101–2; criticism of Abraham Lincoln, 72, 116; for Ulysses S. Grant as Republican nominee for president, 117; on peace mission to Jefferson Davis, 147; on Thirteenth Amendment, 72–3, 92
Bertonneau, Arnold, 85
Bilbo, William N., 182, 183, 197
Bill of Rights, 10, 107
Binney, Horace, 66–70, 87, 105, 222
Black, Jeremiah S., 134, 160
black codes (southern states), 230, 237
black laws (northern states), 166, 170, 188, 220–1, 232
Blaine, James G., 145, 242
Blair, Francis P. (Frank), Jr., 42n, 46, 118, 172n
Blair, Francis P., Sr., 46, 182, 186, 205; peace missions of, 206–7
Blair, Montgomery, 46, 86; on emancipation and reconstruction, 41–2, 78–9; in Abraham Lincoln's cabinet, 118, 123, 155; Maryland Union party of, 173; in promoting Thirteenth Amendment, 183–5
Blyew v. U. S. (1872), 240
border states: antislavery movement in, 37–8, 97; compensated emancipation in, 27, 216; confiscation policy in, 23; conscription in, 168–9; under Emancipation Proclamation, 31, 33;

-297-

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Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Historical Studies in American Law and Society *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Slavery's Constitution 8
  • 2 - Freedom's Constitution 36
  • 3 - Facing Freedom 61
  • 4 - Debating Freedom 89
  • 5 - The Key Note of Freedom 115
  • 6 - The War Within a War: Emancipation and the Election of 1864 141
  • 7 - A King's Cure 176
  • 8 - The Contested Legacy of Constitutional Freedom 211
  • Appendix: Votes on Antislavery Amendment 251
  • Bibliography 253
  • Index 297
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