Barbarism and Religion: The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1764 - Vol. 1

By J. G. A. Pocock | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
The politics of scholarship in French and
English Enlightenment

(I)

Two years before Gibbon set out for Paris, and at the mid-point of his militia service, he had published his first printed work, the Essai sur l'étude de la littérature. In later years he pronounced himself disappointed by this short treatise, which he presented as a piece of juvenilia, written and published prematurely, and there is no sign that he saw it as laying down a programme followed in his subsequent writings. There is, however, a good deal to be learned from a close study of the Essai, and in this section of the present work we shall find that it was a considerable achievement for a man in his early twenties, and that it has much to tell us about Gibbon and his times. We already know that it was begun at Lausanne, where he read d'Alembert's Discours préliminaire à l'Encyclopédie; it therefore confronts us, and may be said to have confronted him, with Enlightenment in its paradigmatic form, that laid down by the philosophes and gens de lettres of Paris when they associated themselves to produce the Encyclopédie under the collective signature of 'une sociètède gens de lettres'. The Encyclopédie is said to contain a programme of philosophic Enlightenment, and though we may debate both the character of this programme and the question whether it is all the Encyclopédie contains, its presence is hard to deny, if only because it seems to have been widely acknowledged by readers in the second half of the eighteenthcentury. The work was muchreprinted and exported to many areas of France and Europe, by a major effort of the publishing industry, not without producing change in that industry itself;1 and it had the effect, and may have had the intention, of transforming the meaning of 'la république des lettres',2 so that the phrase came to denote, first the sociétés de conversation at Paris where the Encyclopédie was produced, second those all over Europe — the 'Europe' of Utrecht and beyond it — who

____________________
1
Darnton, 1979.
2
Goodman, 1994.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Barbarism and Religion: The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1764 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 339

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.