Weimar Surfaces: Urban Visual Culture in 1920s Germany

By Janet Ward | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
Modern Surface
and Postmodern
Simulation

A Retrospective Retrieval

Denn was innen, das ist außen! Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


AGENDAS OF SURFACE AND SIMULACRUM

It is in our time that the Enlightenment project has reached its ultimate implosion. In visual terms, the twentieth century of the western hemisphere will be remembered as the century in which content yielded to form, text to image, depth to façade, and Seinto Schein.For over a hundred years, mass cultural phenomena have been growing in importance, taking over from elite structures of cultural expression to become sites where real power resides, and dominating ever more surely our social imaginary. As reflections of the processes of capitalist industrialization in forms clad for popular consumption, these manifestations are literal and conceptual expressions of surface:1they promote external appearance to us in such arenas as architecture, advertising, film, and fashion. Located as we are at the outset of the new millennium, some may recognize with trepidation that mass culture is becoming so wedded to highly orchestrated and intrusive electronic formats that there seems to be less and less opportunity for any creative maieutics, or participatory “wiggle room. ” Modernity's surfaces, entirely site-and-street-specific yet mobile and mobilizing, have been replaced by the stasis of the fluid mobility granted to our perception by the technologies of television, the VCR, the World Wide Web, and virtual reality. 2

Perhaps as a result of this underlying discomfort, we appear to have a case of what Fredric Jameson has called “inverted millenarianism”: 3rather than look forward at future developments, we choose, almost apotropai-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Weimar Surfaces: Urban Visual Culture in 1920s Germany
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction - A Retrospective Retrieval 1
  • 1 - The Reformation of Weimar Architecture 45
  • 2 - The Shock of the New Objectivity in Weimar Advertising 92
  • 3 - Weimar Surface Culture Goes to the Movies 142
  • 4 - Designs and Desires of Weimar Consumerism 191
  • Appendix - Selected Weimar Periodicals and Newspapers 241
  • Notes 245
  • Illustration Sources 321
  • Index 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.