Myths in Stone: Religious Dimensions of Washington, D.C.

By Jeffrey F. Meyer | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
Quoted in H. Paul Caemmerer, The Life of Pierre Charles L'Enfant (Washington, D. C.: National Republic, 1950; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1970), 128.
2
John W. Reps, Washington on View: The Nation's Capital since 1790 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1991), 20.
3
Ibid., 60.
4
The story of the selection of the site for the capital is well documented in Kenneth R. Bowling, The Creation of Washington, D. C.: The Idea and Location of the American Capital (Fairfax, Va.: George Mason University Press, 1991).
5
Universal Asylum and Columbian Magazine, March 1792. Meridional line means the line drawn south from the polestar perpendicular to the east-west line of the sun's path. This surveyor's method reflects archaic patterns of determining directions and establishing a capital's centrality. It was used in the building of royal cities in many ancient cultures.
6
Fred J. Maroon, The United States Capitol (New York: Steward, Tabori and Chang, 1993), 43. The quotation has been repeated countless times, but historians have tried in vain to verify it.
7
Lynda Lasswell Crist, ed., The Papers of Jefferson Davis (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989), 6:6–7; William C. Davis, Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour (New York: HarperCollins, 1991), 237.
8
Letters to Meigs of March 18, 1856, and October 18, 1855, Records of the Architect of the Capitol, Washington, D. C., Curator's Office.
9
Kirk Savage, Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 1997), 116, 31.
10
Glenn Brown, History of the United States Capitol (Washington, D. C.: Senate Document no. 60, 56th Congress, 1st session, U. S. Government Printing Office, 1900, 1903; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1970), 2:138.
11
Victor Turner and Edith Turner, Image and Pilgrimage in Christian Culture: Anthropological Perspectives (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978), 106.
12
On civil religion as the state religion of the United States, see Robert Bellah,

-283-

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