An Agrarian History of South Asia

By David Ludden | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

Because there are too many relevant titles, I limit citations to monographs and anthologies, as much as possible, and cite later work that supersedes earlier scholarship. I omit some citations which have appeared previously in the footnotes. The lists of titles are alphabetical by authors, and each author's titles are listed chronologically. A fuller bibliography, which I will update and expand, appears on my homepage: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/∼dludden/.


Intellectual history

Agriculture became an official topic for scholarly analysis under Company Raj. The most useful monographs on agrarian ideas in the Company period are S. Ambirajan, Classical Political Economy and British Policy in India (Cambridge, 1968), Ranajit Guha, A Rule of Property for Bengal (Paris, 1963), Burton Stein, Thomas Munro: The Origins of the Colonial State and His Vision of Empire (Delhi, 1989), and Eric Stokes, The English Utilitarians and India (Oxford, 1959). For the later Raj, see B. R. Tomlinson, The Political Economy of the Raj, 1914–1947: The Economics of Decolonization (New York, 1979) and Bipan Chandra, The Rise and Growth of Economic Nationalism in India: Economic Policies of the Indian National Leadership, 1880–1905 (New Delhi, 1966), which is supplemented by Bipan Chandra's editing of M. G. Ranade, Ranade's Economic Writings (New Delhi, 1990). For post-19 503 official thought, see A. M. Zaidi and S. G. Zaidi, The Foundations of Indian Economic Planning (New Delhi, 1979) and A. Moin Zaidi, ed., A Tryst with Destiny: A Study of Economic Policy Resolutions of the INC Passed During the Last 100 Years (New Delhi, 1985).

Histories of historical writing, with reprints of scholarly classics, are appearing in the series entitled Oxford in India Readings: Themes in Indian History, from Oxford University Press, Delhi — see especially the volumes edited by Sugata Bose, Credit Markets and the Agrarian Economy of Colonial India (Delhi, 1994), Sumit Guha, Growth, Stagnation, or Decline? Agricultural Productivity in British India (Delhi, 1992), David Hardiman, Peasant Resistance in India, 1858–1914 (Delhi, 1992), David Ludden, Agricultural Production and Indian History (Delhi, 1994), Cyan Prakash, The World of the Rural Labourer in Colonial India (Delhi, 1992), Burton Stein, The Making of Agrarian Policy in British India, 1770–1900 (Delhi, 1992), and Sanjay Subrahmanyam, Money and the Market in India 1100–1700 (Delhi, 1994). The new Oxford series Readings in Early Indian History has opened with a volume edited by Bhairabi Prasad Sahu, Land System and Rural Society in Early India (Delhi, 1997), whose introduction is a history of relevant scholarship.

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An Agrarian History of South Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The New Cambridge History of India *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • General Editor's Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Agriculture 6
  • Chapter 2 - Territory 60
  • Chapter 3 - Regions 113
  • Chapter 4 - Modernity 167
  • Bibliographical Essay 231
  • Index 249
  • The New Cambridge History of India 262
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