CAMBRIDGE STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY

General editor ERNEST SOSA

Advisory editors
JONATHAN DANCY University of Reading
JOHN HALDANE University of St Andrews
GILBERT HARMAN Princeton University
FRANK JACKSON Australian National University
WILLIAM G. LYCAN University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
SYDNEY SHOEMAKER Cornell University
JUDITH J. THOMSON Massachusetts Institute of Technology

RECENT TITLES
JOSHUA HOFFMAN & GARY S. ROSENKRANTZ Substance among other categories
PAUL HELM Belief policies
NOAH LEMOS Intrinsic value
LYNNE RUDDER BAKER Explaining attitudes
HENRY S. RICHARDSON Practical reasoning about final ends
ROBERT A. WILSON Cartesian psychology and physical minds
BARRY MAUND Colours
MICHAEL DEVITT Coming to our senses
SYDNEY sHOEMAKER The first-person perspective and other essays
MICHAEL STOCKER Valuing emotions
ARDA DENKEL Object and property
E. J. LOWE Subjects of experience
NORTON NELKIN Consciousness and the origins of thought
PIERRE JACOB What minds can do
ANDRE GALLOIS The world without, the mind within
D. M. ARMSTRONG A world of states of affairs
DAVID COCKBURN Other times
MARK LANCE & JOHN O'LEARY-HAWTHORNE The grammar of meaning
ANNETTE BARNES Seeing through self-deception
DAVID LEWIS Papers in metaphysics and epistemology
MICHAEL BRATMAN Faces of intention
DAVID LEWIS Papers in ethics and social philosophy
MARK ROWLANDS The body in mind: understanding cognitive processes
LOGI GUNNARSSON Making moral sense: beyond Habermas and Gauthier

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Theories of Vagueness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy - Theories of Vagueness *
  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy *
  • Title Page *
  • For My Parents, Sheila and Terry *
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Phenomena of Vagueness 6
  • 2 - How to Theorise About Vagueness 37
  • 3 - The Epistemic View of Vagueness 62
  • 4 - Between Truth and Falsity: Many-Valued Logics 85
  • 5 - Vagueness by Numbers 125
  • 6 - The Pragmatic Account of Vagueness 139
  • 7 - Supervaluationism 152
  • 8 - Truth is Super-Truth 202
  • References 221
  • Index 229
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