Acknowledgements

Chapter 5 is a slightly revised version of my paper 'Vagueness by numbers' in Mind 107, and a version of chapter 6 appeared in The Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 as 'Vagueness and language clusters'; I am grateful to Oxford University Press for permission to use this material. Parts of the introduction to Vagueness: A Reader, ed. Rosanna Keefe and Peter Smith (MIT Press 1997) also appear in this book (particularly in chapter 1).

A large number of people have helped and influenced me since I started working on vagueness. My doctoral thesis on the topic was supervised by Timothy Smiley and examined by Alex Oliver and Mark Sainsbury: I am much obliged to them for constructive criticism and many helpful suggestions. Thanks too to Chris Daly and Joseph Melia, who were both there at the beginning of my doctorate and have continued to give me help and advice ever since. Peter Smith has generously discussed various drafts of my work since we began co-editing Vagueness: A Reader. And for perceptive comments and much fruitful informal chat I am very grateful to Dominic Gregory, who nevertheless always appreciates when the day's philosophy is over.

A wide range of useful comments have also been made by Linda Burns, Jeremy Butterfield, Bob Hanna, Katherine Hawley, David Hemp, Richard Holton, Terry Keefe, Jochen Runde, Timothy Williamson, an anonymous reader for Cambridge University Press, and audiences for my talks at the Universities of Sheffield, Cambridge, Leeds, York and Bristol as well as at the conference on vagueness in Bled, Slovenia (June 1998). I am indebted to Hilary Gaskin of Cambridge University Press for general help with preparation of the book.

I am extremely grateful to Jesus College, Cambridge, which supported me for three years in a Research Fellowship. This provided

-xi-

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Theories of Vagueness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy - Theories of Vagueness *
  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy *
  • Title Page *
  • For My Parents, Sheila and Terry *
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Phenomena of Vagueness 6
  • 2 - How to Theorise About Vagueness 37
  • 3 - The Epistemic View of Vagueness 62
  • 4 - Between Truth and Falsity: Many-Valued Logics 85
  • 5 - Vagueness by Numbers 125
  • 6 - The Pragmatic Account of Vagueness 139
  • 7 - Supervaluationism 152
  • 8 - Truth is Super-Truth 202
  • References 221
  • Index 229
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