Index
adjunction 198
admissible specifications 162, 202, 207; see also supervaluationism
admissibility, as vague 202–3, 209–10
adverbs, vague 159
ambiguity 10–11, 156–8, 199
analytic truths 110, 148
and-elimination 45
argument by cases 176, 179–80
Aristotle 38, 40, 215
Armstrong, D. M. 78
Barnes, J. 8
bivalence 2, 29, 47, 63, 154; see also classical logic and semantics
Black, M. 114, 128
blurred boundaries see sharp boundaries
borderline cases 1–2, 6, 7, 17
and indeterminacy 12, 41, 153
and many-valued theories 85, 90, 92, 96–8, 155
and supervaluationism 153, 154
and the epistemic view 63, 67–8
borderline borderline cases see higherorder vagueness
lack of sharp boundaries to 31–6, 112–24, 131, 143, 202–11; see also higher-order vagueness
our responses to 43–4, 71–2, 142, 147, 154–5
boundarylessness 34; see also sharp boundaries
Burgess, J. A. 33, 194–7
Burns, L. C. 139, 141–5, 147, 149, 150–1, 183
Bumyeat, M. F. 8
Campbell, R. 28, 62, 63
Cargile. J. 18, 52, 62, 63
Carnap, R. 9
Chambers, T. 22
Chrysippus 62
Cicero 62
circularity 205–7
classical logic and semantics
challenged by vagueness 6, 83
extent of revisability 47–9, 103
retained despite vagueness 16, 52, 62, 139, 152
see also bivalence; law of excluded middle; supervaluationism, its logic
comparatives 12–14, 129, 135, 169–71, 181
completability condition 167; see also supervaluationism
conceptual truths 190; see also analytic truths
conditional proof 111, 176, 179
conditionals 20, 87, 88, 96–8, 99, 102, 110, 133, 134
conjunction 86, 87, 88, 96, 97, 99, 102, 103, 194, 196
connectedness axiom 126, 128–29
connectives see conditionals; conjunction; disjunction; negation
consequence; see validity
context-dependence 10, 150, 172–3
contraposition 45, 176, 179
Cooper, N. 12
D operator 26–30
and degree theories 27
and higher-order vagueness 31, 35–6, 208–11
and supervaluationism 27, 167–8, 176–81, 190, 201, 208–11
as primitive 27–9
Davidson, D. 158
deduction theorem 111, 176, 179

-229-

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Theories of Vagueness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy - Theories of Vagueness *
  • Cambridge Studies in Philosophy *
  • Title Page *
  • For My Parents, Sheila and Terry *
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Phenomena of Vagueness 6
  • 2 - How to Theorise About Vagueness 37
  • 3 - The Epistemic View of Vagueness 62
  • 4 - Between Truth and Falsity: Many-Valued Logics 85
  • 5 - Vagueness by Numbers 125
  • 6 - The Pragmatic Account of Vagueness 139
  • 7 - Supervaluationism 152
  • 8 - Truth is Super-Truth 202
  • References 221
  • Index 229
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