Defending Literature in Early Modern England: Renaissance Literary Theory in Social Context

By Robert Matz | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A number of friends and colleagues at Johns Hopkins and George Mason University kindly read and helpfully commented on sections of this work. Many thanks to Denise Albanese, David Baker, Charles Dove, Dorice Elliott, David Glimp, Elaine Hadley, Devon Hodges, Rosemary Jann, Barbara Melosh, Cynthia Rogers, Jennifer Summit, and Ned Weed. I've also had the pleasure of wonderful teachers in the English departments at Johns Hopkins and Cornell. I want particularly to express my appreciation to Jonathan Goldberg. As advisor to my dissertation at Johns Hopkins, not to mention through his own critical work, he has taught me a great deal, and provided me with a model of scholarly generosity and energy that I greatly admire. I am glad to have a chance to thank him in print. As my dissertation's second reader, John Guillory provided valuable advice and clear formulations. Thanks also to the George Mason University College of Arts and Sciences, which provided financial support for the completion of this book through its Summer Stipend for Junior Faculty Work. A portion of chapter 3 originally appeared in English Literary Renaissance 25 (1995): 131–47. Thanks to the journal for permission to reprint it here. Stephen Orgel was generous with his time and support during this book's publication. At Cambridge University Press, Josie Dixon provided invaluable editorial counsel, and Sue Dickinson gave keen and unflagging attention to the final preparation of the book. Teresa Michals has read or heard – and improved – every one of these pages. She has been a wonderful companion not only through the dificult passages, but the happy ones as well. My new son David has helped me think further about the meaning of play. Finally, this book could not have been completed without the loving and unfaltering support that I have received from the rest of my family and especially from my parents. This book is dedicated to them.

-xi-

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Defending Literature in Early Modern England: Renaissance Literary Theory in Social Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction: “aut Prodesse … Aut Delectare” 1
  • 2 - Recreating Reading: Elyot's Boke Named the Governour 25
  • 3 - Heroic Diversions: Sidney's Defence of Poetry 56
  • 4 - A “gentle Discipline”: Spenser's Faerie Queene 88
  • 5 - Epilogue: from Text to Work? 128
  • Notes 137
  • Bibliography 172
  • Index 182
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