Taking Back the Streets: Women, Youth, and Direct Democracy

By Temma Kaplan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Pots and Pans Will
Break My Bones

Nieves Ayress was not the only one determined to remember. Among Salvador Allende's; advisors, Valencian Joan Garcés had already written about some of the political crises the government endured, and he continued to act as a witness after he escaped from Chile. 1 But few wrote about daily life under the Popular Unity (Unidad Popular, UP) government. Two exceptions, María Correa Morandé and Teresa Donoso Loero, wrote from their perspective as right-wing women leaders who proudly boasted about helping to overthrow the UP. 2 On the other side, just after the coup, trying to keep alive the memory of what Allende had tried to achieve, American activist Carol Andreas reflected on her life in Chile. 3 But many people who dedicated themselves to getting people out of the country and publicizing the continued repression had no time to reminisce about how they fit into the movement to democratize Chile. Writers Ariel Dorfman and Marc Cooper had to wait almost thirty years to recall the heady days of the UP and the growing crisis that engulfed it. 4

The Chile I encountered in the 1990s was a far cry from the country from which Nieves Ayress was expelled in 1977. A plebiscite in 1988, designed to keep dictator Augusto Pinochet in power for another decade, accomplished the impossible: he was voted out of office and replaced by a moderate democracy. It was difficult to reconstruct the history of actions that are shrouded in silence born of regret and shame. Rather than remember their own fears and the ways they acted on

-40-

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Taking Back the Streets: Women, Youth, and Direct Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Prologue - Tacking Back the Streets 1
  • Chapter 1 - Staying Alive Through Struggle 15
  • Chapter 2 - Pots and Pans Will Break My Bones 40
  • Chapter 3 - Democracy in the Country and in the Streets 73
  • Chapter 4 - Searching and Remembering 102
  • Chapter 5 - Memory Through Mobilization 128
  • Chapter 6 - Youth Finds a Way 152
  • Chapter 7 - Demonstrating to Remember in Spain 176
  • Epilogue - Mobilizing for Democracy 203
  • Notes 211
  • Index 263
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