Taking Back the Streets: Women, Youth, and Direct Democracy

By Temma Kaplan | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE
1
In his discussion of Michel Foucault's; ideas about the panopticon replacing the prison cell as a way of establishing discipline after the French Revolution, historian Martin Jay speaks about the “sadistic gaze of a diffuse and anonymous power whose actual existence soon becomes superfluous to the process of discipline. ” See Martin Jay, Downcast Eyes: The Denigration of Vision in Twentieth-Century French Thought (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994), p. 410.
2
Maurice Halbwach, On Collective Memory, ed. Lewis A. Coser (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992), pp. 174–75. Those engaging in participatory democracy through direct action seldom justify themselves in written arguments, but make political arguments through their action, a phenomenon that has been studied in depth by social movement theorists. These theorists roughly divide into two groups according to the emphasis they place on identity. In confronting older theories that any collective behavior was largely irrational, one group has emphasized the rational choices that participants in social movements make. As an antidote to the subsequent idea that people make choices purely out of self-interest, the other group has attempted to demonstrate that passions and commitments galvanize participants to take action and sustain them in their struggles. See, for example, Jeff Goodwin, James M. Jasper, and Francesca Polletta, eds., Passionate Politics: Emotions and Social Movements (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001). I am grateful to Erich Goode for introducing me to this volume.

While trying to account for the motivations of activists, however, these theories have not considered the place of visual images in projecting certain views of democracy and justice, the way reestablishing solidarity and a sense of group cohe

-211-

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Taking Back the Streets: Women, Youth, and Direct Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Prologue - Tacking Back the Streets 1
  • Chapter 1 - Staying Alive Through Struggle 15
  • Chapter 2 - Pots and Pans Will Break My Bones 40
  • Chapter 3 - Democracy in the Country and in the Streets 73
  • Chapter 4 - Searching and Remembering 102
  • Chapter 5 - Memory Through Mobilization 128
  • Chapter 6 - Youth Finds a Way 152
  • Chapter 7 - Demonstrating to Remember in Spain 176
  • Epilogue - Mobilizing for Democracy 203
  • Notes 211
  • Index 263
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