Policing Africa: Internal Security and the Limits of Liberalization

By Alice Hills | Go to book overview

5
Models of African Policing:
Construction and Integration

In both Ethiopia and Eritrea, the new regimes were formed from reformist insurgencies that incorporated the insurgents' own organizations into the new governments and their policing systems. Whereas the rejection of the previous system's excesses resulted in the conversion (and to a degree continuity) of the police in Ethiopia, in Eritrea it produced a new force.


Model 3—Construction: Eritrea

The construction of an original police system is atypical; international intervention, for instance, is more likely to result in the improvement or reconstruction (as in Angola and Namibia) of a force than its outright creation. But the example of Eritrea shows that construction can occur if a new state is internationally acknowledged, particularly after an unambiguous military victory.

The Eritrean force directly reflects the political environment in Eritrea rather than external influences. Yet at the same time it is important because it provides additional evidence for linking case-specific police systems to the conventionalities of both policing and order. It shows that the practicalities of policing limit the options available to even new forces.


Postconflict Beginnings: The Political Environment

The capture of Asmara, the provincial capital, and the Red Sea port of Massawa (Ethiopia's only direct access to the sea) in 1991 left the guerrilla insurgent group known as the Eritrean People's Liberation Front (EPLF) victorious after a thirty-year armed struggle for the right to selfdetermination. 1 Political agreement was quickly reached, partly so as to

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Policing Africa: Internal Security and the Limits of Liberalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • 1 - Toward a Critique of Policing and National Development in Sub-Saharan Africa Since 1990 1
  • Notes 21
  • 2 - Policing the Postcolonial State 27
  • Notes *
  • 3 - The Police and Politics 55
  • Notes 84
  • 4 - Models of African Policing: Evolution and Conversion 89
  • Notes 111
  • 5 - Models of African Policing:Construction and Integration 115
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Models of African Policing:Transition 139
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Models of African Policing:Adaptation 161
  • Notes *
  • 8 - Conclusion:Modalities of Policing Africa 185
  • Notes *
  • Acronyms 193
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 207
  • About the Book 213
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