Security and Politics in South Africa: The Regional Dimension

By Peter Vale | Go to book overview

1
New Beginning

As the first step in our analysis of security in southern Africa, let us recall Oskar Wolberheim:

One day last spring he entered my house With a branch in his hand. He was no dove, And he was carrying an aloe branch.

He said good morning quietly, Sat down at my table and cut the aloe Into little cubes. Using my milk and sugar He made himself a breakfast dish. And I could not ask him how he had enjoyed it Because the aloe juice had deprived him Of the power of speech.

—quoted in Don Maclennan and Norbert Nowotny, In Memoriam: Oskar Wolberheim

In this book I explore the ideas that surround security in the region of southern Africa during the early twenty-first century. The frame that guides it is critical, hence the name of the series—Critical Security Studies—under which this book appears. To critically engage security and its problematique (in southern Africa and elsewhere) ignites deep-seated epistemological (how we know what we know) and ontological (the way we understand something) concerns, and in every word and each sentence in this book, it is difficult not to trip over these issues. To privilege conceptual ideas, as I already have and will continue to do throughout this writing, signals a major departure from other studies that join (or carry) in the same text the idea of security as well as that of southern Africa. Conceived or contrived in (sometimes near) the tradition of positive scholarship, this work is primarily concerned with the management, manufacture,

-7-

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Security and Politics in South Africa: The Regional Dimension
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Prologue 1
  • 1 - New Beginning 7
  • 2 - The South African Moment 29
  • 3 - Making South Africa's Security 57
  • 4 - Writing Migration as Neoapartheid 85
  • 5 - Ordering Southern Africa 107
  • 6 - Continuity and Community 135
  • 7 - Primus Inter Pares? 161
  • Afterword 179
  • Notes 191
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 243
  • About the Book 251
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