Taming the Elephant: Politics, Government, and Law in Pioneer California

By John F. Burns; Richard J. Orsi | Go to book overview

Preface

As much as today's state legislators, officials, and bureaucrats are criticized in California—sometimes with just cause—the first generation of political and governmental leaders was even more vilified in its own day. Many of them, it turned out, were—like their fellow Argonauts—short-termers, more passionate about “making their pile” and heading back to where they had hailed from than they were about building a new community and polity. Addicted to party and factional infighting, giving and receiving patronage, and even on occasion fighting or dueling to redress petty slights or to get their way, California's “founding fathers” were roundly condemned for their corruption, low moral standards, and general lack of accomplishments. Meeting in the winter of 1849–50, the first body of representatives, for example, was widely ridiculed as the “Legislature of a Thousand Drinks. ” Nor did governors escape the representatives' ill repute. Contemporary historian Hubert Howe Bancroft criticized the first governor, Peter Burnett, as “too slow in action, too wordy in speech, too conservative for the period, and too prejudiced for the rapid changes taking place”; even Burnett described himself as having “feeble abilities … [that] allowed me to accomplish so little for the state. ” Another early governor—John McDougal—the public labeled “that gentlemanly drunkard. ”

With a few exceptions, later historians have followed the lead of the state's first citizens. In historical accounts, the first politicians, to the extent that they are even discussed, are portrayed as self-interested, disengaged, racially prejudiced, and venal, or at best incompetent. As a result, historians treat pioneer California's government as generally ineffective in coping with the great challenges of rapid population growth and economic change. Most often, however, in the historical literature, the establishment of early government in the state is simply ignored.

The first major dissenter from this evaluation, the first to take the subject seriously

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taming the Elephant: Politics, Government, and Law in Pioneer California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - An Introduction to California's Statehood and Constitutional Era 1
  • Notes *
  • 2 - Disorder, Crime, and Law Enforcement, 1849–1890 27
  • Notes *
  • 3 - The Courts, the Legal Profession, and the Development of Law in Early California 74
  • Notes *
  • 4 - The Politics of Law and Race in California, 1848–1878 96
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Capturing California 126
  • Notes *
  • 6 - California State Government, 1849–1879 137
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Women, Law, and Government in California, 1850–1890 169
  • Notes *
  • 8 - The Beginnings of Anglo-American Local Government in California 199
  • Notes *
  • 9 - The Role of the Federal Government in California, 1846–1880 224
  • Notes *
  • Contributors 273
  • Index 277
  • Donors to the California Historical Society - Volume 81, No. 3/4 *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.