Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology

By Velcheru Narayana Rao; David Shulman | Go to book overview

FOUR
Tikkana
Thirteenth century

Nannaya's great successor, who completed most of the Telugu Mahābhārata, was Tikkana, minister to a small king called Manumasiddhi in Nĕllūru (present—day Nellore). We know the names of his parents, Annamâmba and Kŏmmanâmātya, and his title, Somayāji, which seems to reflect a ritual (Vedic sacrificial) role. He plays a major part in later literary tradition, such as in the Pratāparuda caritramu of Ekâmranātha and the Siddheśvara caritramu of Kāsĕ Sarvappa (17th century), where he appears as a deft negotiator and a relentless enemy of Buddhism and Jainism. He is said to have won a victory for his king—in effect to have reinstated him on his throne after Manumasiddhi had been driven away by his enemies, Akkana and Bayyana— by a personal mission to the Kākatīya king Gaṇapati Deva. His image is of an active, imaginative ideologue no less than a sophisticated and innovative poet.

Along with his parts of the Mahābhārata, Tikkana composed an Uttararāmāyaṇamu, popularly known as Nirvacanottara—rāmāyaṇamu because it contains no prose passages (vacanam); the book is dedicated to Manumasiddhi. His Mahābhārata is dedicated to the god Harihara[w10]atha, a conjoined form of Visnu and śiva.

In his colophons, Tikkana calls himself ubhaya—kavi—mitra, “a friend of both schools of poetry. ” It is unclear what he means by this, but it is possible that the reference is to śaiva and non—śaiva streams, which in this context run parallel to deśi (“local, regional, popular”) and mārga (elevated, Sanskritic, classical). Both his syntax and diction were strikingly Dravidian, and never emulated by his successors. Straddling the boundaries of oral/performative and written/monological composition, Tikkana stands alone in the whole history of Telugu literature, a figure of remarkable individual creativity.

The passage chosen for this anthology, from the fourth book of the

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.