Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology

By Velcheru Narayana Rao; David Shulman | Go to book overview

ELEVEN
Allasāni Pĕddana
Early sixteenth century

In the courtly tradition of classical Telugu, Allasāni Pĕddana stands out as possibly the supreme achievement. Only one great work of his has survived: the Manu—caritramu, which tells the story of the birth of the First Man, Svārociṣa Manu, on the basis of the earlier narration in Mārkaṇḍeya—purāṇa (probably known to Pĕddana through Mārana's late thirteenth– or early fourteenth—century Telugu version). Pĕddana's choice of this text is surely meaningful, for it offers a vision of human generativity and human fate very much in line with the dominant concerns of the early sixteenth century at the Vijayanagara capital.

Pĕddana is closely tied to Kṛṣṇadevarāya, whose genealogy he gives in the preamble to his book. (Kṛṣṇadevarāya quotes from Pĕddana's genealogical verses in the introduction to his work, the Āmukta—mālyada; this citation may have contributed to the erroneous notion that Pĕddana was the author of the latter work as well.) The cāṭu tradition asserts that the king himself tied the gaṇḍa—pĕṇḍeramu, the “hero's anklet, ” onto the poet's left foot; the anklet bore the images of all rival poets, so that anyone who wore it would be seen as kicking these rivals on their heads. This act of royal recognition is said to have followed Pĕddana's improvisation of the long utpala—mālika, translated below, which sets out the new contours of poetic composition in Sanskrit and Telugu. The existence of this verse, in the oral tradition, signals the emergence of a new aesthetic in Telugu kāyva.

The Manu—caritramu itself bears witness to Pĕddana's place among the literati: the king, in commissioning this work, refers to its author as āndhrakavitā–pitāmaha, the “creator of Telugu poetry” (1.15). There is clearly a sense in which this is true: Pĕddana transformed kāyva into a medium of amazing density, precision, and exquisite lyricism. His descriptive passages

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.