Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology

By Velcheru Narayana Rao; David Shulman | Go to book overview

EIGHTEEN
Appakavi
Mid—seventeenth century

Perhaps the most influential grammarian in Telugu, Kākunūri Appakavi how he came to compose his book in 1656. He was living in the village of Kāmĕpalli in Palnāḍu when, one night, Viṣṇu appeared in his dream and prepared him for the arrival the next morning of a Brahmin from Mataṅga Hill, who would be carrying a written copy of the grammatical sūtras attributed to Nannaya and known as Āndhra—s′abda—cintāmaṇi. Like other important books, this grammar is said to have been lost and miraculously recovered. Appakavi tells us that he made his own copy of the Brahmin's text; Appakavi's work then takes the form of a commentary on the original sūtras. Although some of the sūtra material may go back as far as Nannaya, the story seems to preserve the memory of a moment of creative synthesis in Telugu linguistics and poetics, in the mid—seventeenth century, retrospectively linked with an imagined original text that can be attributed to the first poet. Moreover, despite the self—description of the Appakavīyamu as a commentary, it is really a highly original book that uses the sūtras as little more than a hook on which to hang new ideas.

Unfortunately, only two chapters of Appakavi's text have survived: the sections on phonology and metrics. The latter subject clearly engaged the attention of Andhra poets and scholars in this period and earlier,1 as dozens of surviving metrical treatises can attest. This fascination with metrical rules is part of a wider and more fundamental interest in the potent properties of

____________________
1
The earliest we have is Kavi—janâśrayamu by Malliya Recana (perhaps eleventh century), though attributed to Bhīmakavi. Appakavi cites this work (3.260) and also finds it necessary to defend its author from “mistakes” that he classes as later interpolations—since, by definition, the first grammar of metrics should have no faults.

-230-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classical Telugu Poetry: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.