Handbook of Reading Research

By P. David Pearson | Go to book overview

Preface

If the gestation period of books, like those of animals, varies directly as a function of adult body weight, then the six-year pregnancy of this volume may be justified. It has been a labor of love, anger, frustration, awe, surprise, and serendipity. In short, it has progressed like any good marriage of authors, editors, and publishers.

Those of us who participated in the conception, labor, and birth hope that the offspring will prove, above all, to be useful to the reading research community— to those who will produce the next generation of reading research, to those who produced the previous generation of research, and to those who use reading research to guide their work in developing reading curricula, reading materials, and reading instruction.

We have chosen the term Handbook to serve as part of the title intentionally, for we hope that the book will be regarded as much a reference tool as it is a textbook. We have tried to provide, in a single volume, a characterization of both our current state of methodological prowess and our cumulative research-based knowledge. The chapters in Part One have been written in order to provide the reader with a perspective on important methodological issues and tensions in conducting reading research. Richard Venezky's opening salvo on the history of reading research, followed by Michael KamiPs spritely characterization of the reading research scene today, set the context for not only the rest of Part One, but really for the entire volume. The remaining four chapters in Part One are a mixture of “how to” advice and “ycm ought to be careful about X” admonitions that researchers need to consider as they plan and implement research endeavors. Part Two (basic process in reading) and Part Three (instructional practices in reading) contain reviews of research in important areas of reading. The authors of these chapters were asked to write reviews that were as “current and comprehensive” as possible, given the time constraints on moving from manuscript to bound books. These chapters, several of which have already become “classics” in their own right in pre-publication form, should provide convenient jumping-off points for scholars who wish to pursue research in particular areas. They should also serve as “landing areas” for these readers who simply want to know what the research has to say about a given topic.

We have tried to provide a number of features that we hope readers find helpful. While the subheadings in Parts Two and Three vary from chapter to chap-

-xxi-

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Handbook of Reading Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors ix
  • Foreword xix
  • Preface xxi
  • Part One - Methodological Issues 1
  • 1 - The History of Reading Research 3
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - Current Traditions of Reading Research 39
  • References *
  • 3 - Design and Analysis of Experiments 63
  • References *
  • 4 - Ethnographic Approaches to Reading Research 91
  • References *
  • 5 - Examples from Word Recognition 111
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - Assessment in Reading 147
  • References *
  • Part Two - Basic Processes: the State of the Art 183
  • 7 - Models of the Reading Process 185
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Word Recognition 225
  • References *
  • 9 - A Schema-Theoretic View of Basic Processes in Reading Comprehension 255
  • References *
  • 10 - Listening and Reading 293
  • References *
  • 11 - The Structure of Text 319
  • References *
  • 12 - Metacognitive Skills and Reading 353
  • References *
  • 13 - Directions in the Sociolinguistic Study of Reading 395
  • References *
  • 14 - Social and Motivational Influences on Reading 423
  • Notes 443
  • References *
  • 15 - Understanding Figurative Language 453
  • References *
  • 16 - Individual Differences and Underlying Cognitive Processes in Reading 471
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part Three - Instructional Practices: the State of the Art 503
  • 17 - Early Reading from a Developmental Perspective 505
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 18 - From Debate to Reformation 545
  • Notes 575
  • References *
  • 19 - Word Identification 583
  • References *
  • 20 - Research on Teaching Reading Comprehension 609
  • References *
  • 21 - Studying 657
  • References *
  • 22 - Readability 681
  • References *
  • 23 - Classroom Instruction in Reading 745
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 24 - Managing Instruction 799
  • References *
  • 25 - Oral Reading 829
  • References *
  • Author Index 865
  • Subject Index 891
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