Handbook of Reading Research

By P. David Pearson | Go to book overview

17
EARLY READING FROM
A DEVELOPMENTAL
PERSPECTIVE
Jana M. Mason

Interest in early reading, while it has important links to the past, is a relatively recent concern, because until this century high levels of literacy were not required (Resnick & Resnick, 1977). Nonetheless, there are links to early education which need to be traced, for they help show how and why reading instruction of young (preschool) children has been controversial.


A Brief Historical Perspective

A central issue, which some would argue can be traced back many centuries, is what sort of instruction young children ought to receive. Plato argued:

Now you know that in every enterprise the beginning is the main thing, especially in dealing with a young and tender nature. For at that time it is most plastic, and the stamp sinks in deepest which it is desired to impress upon anyone.

Just so.

Shall we then quite lightly give licence for our children to hear any chance fables imagined by any chance people, and to receive in their souls impressions opposed to those which, when they have come to maturity, we shall think that they ought to possess?

We must not permit it in the smallest degree.

To begin with, as it seems, we must control the composers of fables, and select any good ones which they compose, and reject what are not good. And we will persuade the nurses and mothers to tell the children those fables which we have selected, seeing that they mould their souls with the tales they tell, far more really than their bodies with their hands. (Plato, 1917, p. 51)

The research reported herein was supported in part by the National Institute of Education under Contract No. HEW-NIE-C-400–76–0116 and was prepared principally during a sabbatical leave from the University of Illinois in 1979 at Stanford University. Revised from Tech. Rep. No. 198, Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois, Champaign.

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Handbook of Reading Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors ix
  • Foreword xix
  • Preface xxi
  • Part One - Methodological Issues 1
  • 1 - The History of Reading Research 3
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - Current Traditions of Reading Research 39
  • References *
  • 3 - Design and Analysis of Experiments 63
  • References *
  • 4 - Ethnographic Approaches to Reading Research 91
  • References *
  • 5 - Examples from Word Recognition 111
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - Assessment in Reading 147
  • References *
  • Part Two - Basic Processes: the State of the Art 183
  • 7 - Models of the Reading Process 185
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Word Recognition 225
  • References *
  • 9 - A Schema-Theoretic View of Basic Processes in Reading Comprehension 255
  • References *
  • 10 - Listening and Reading 293
  • References *
  • 11 - The Structure of Text 319
  • References *
  • 12 - Metacognitive Skills and Reading 353
  • References *
  • 13 - Directions in the Sociolinguistic Study of Reading 395
  • References *
  • 14 - Social and Motivational Influences on Reading 423
  • Notes 443
  • References *
  • 15 - Understanding Figurative Language 453
  • References *
  • 16 - Individual Differences and Underlying Cognitive Processes in Reading 471
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part Three - Instructional Practices: the State of the Art 503
  • 17 - Early Reading from a Developmental Perspective 505
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 18 - From Debate to Reformation 545
  • Notes 575
  • References *
  • 19 - Word Identification 583
  • References *
  • 20 - Research on Teaching Reading Comprehension 609
  • References *
  • 21 - Studying 657
  • References *
  • 22 - Readability 681
  • References *
  • 23 - Classroom Instruction in Reading 745
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 24 - Managing Instruction 799
  • References *
  • 25 - Oral Reading 829
  • References *
  • Author Index 865
  • Subject Index 891
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