Handbook of Reading Research

By P. David Pearson | Go to book overview

SUBJECT INDEX

A
Ability, 424–425
Abstractness, 695
Academic emphasis, 752–758, 787
Academic-engaged time, 745–746, 776–785, 792
Academic learning time (ALT), 562–563, 813
Accuracy, 227–228
Achievement
cognitive determinants of, 424–426
content covered and, 773–774, 788–789
engagement and, 779–780
error rate and, 785–787
and instructional time, 20–21
motivation, 423–452
oral reading and, 834
outcomes, 424–425
peer influences on, 441–442
silent reading and, 834
success rate and, 785–787, 789, 792
task orientation and, 752–753
teacher time and, 748–749
Adaptability, 491
Advance organizer, 258, 614–617
Affect, 753–756
Affixes, 598
Alias, 74
Allocated time, 780–782, 784–785
Allocation decisions, 565–566
Alphabetic writing system, 313, 315
ALT, see Academic learning time
Amalgamation, 510
Ambiguity, 239
Analogy, 116, 613–614
definition of, 613
Anthropology, 397–398
Anticipation, 373
Anxiety, 438–439
Aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI), 554–556, 557, 574
ARI, see Automated Readability Index
Arrangement, 323
Artificial intelligence, 326–327
Assessment, 147–183, 835–842 see also Tests
domain-referenced, 159
focus of, 165–167
individual, 172–175
methodology, 150–153
objectives-based, 159
of remedial student, 165–166
teacher education on, 175
Assigning case roles, 215
Assistance, 833
Attention, 197–198, 272–278, 439 see also Academic-engaged time
focusing, 614–621, 632–633, 660–665
selective, 272–278
ATI, see Aptitude-treatment interaction
Attribution retraining, 437–438
Auding, 293–317
deafness and, 298
definition of, 293
rate, 298–300
to reading transfer concept, 300–305
training, 303–304
Auditory discrimination, 534–535
Automated Readability Index (ARI), 692–693

B
Background knowledge, 612–613, 630–632, 725
activation of, 614–621
Backward recognition masking, 130–136, 228
Basal readers, 800–801, 807–808
Base words, 598
Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES), 561–564, 567, 745–746, 747, 749, 776, 777, 780–787, 789, 792, 813
Behavioral objectives, 658–659
Behaviorism, 12, 188
Belief-consistent distortions, 285

-891-

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Handbook of Reading Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors ix
  • Foreword xix
  • Preface xxi
  • Part One - Methodological Issues 1
  • 1 - The History of Reading Research 3
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - Current Traditions of Reading Research 39
  • References *
  • 3 - Design and Analysis of Experiments 63
  • References *
  • 4 - Ethnographic Approaches to Reading Research 91
  • References *
  • 5 - Examples from Word Recognition 111
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - Assessment in Reading 147
  • References *
  • Part Two - Basic Processes: the State of the Art 183
  • 7 - Models of the Reading Process 185
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Word Recognition 225
  • References *
  • 9 - A Schema-Theoretic View of Basic Processes in Reading Comprehension 255
  • References *
  • 10 - Listening and Reading 293
  • References *
  • 11 - The Structure of Text 319
  • References *
  • 12 - Metacognitive Skills and Reading 353
  • References *
  • 13 - Directions in the Sociolinguistic Study of Reading 395
  • References *
  • 14 - Social and Motivational Influences on Reading 423
  • Notes 443
  • References *
  • 15 - Understanding Figurative Language 453
  • References *
  • 16 - Individual Differences and Underlying Cognitive Processes in Reading 471
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part Three - Instructional Practices: the State of the Art 503
  • 17 - Early Reading from a Developmental Perspective 505
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 18 - From Debate to Reformation 545
  • Notes 575
  • References *
  • 19 - Word Identification 583
  • References *
  • 20 - Research on Teaching Reading Comprehension 609
  • References *
  • 21 - Studying 657
  • References *
  • 22 - Readability 681
  • References *
  • 23 - Classroom Instruction in Reading 745
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 24 - Managing Instruction 799
  • References *
  • 25 - Oral Reading 829
  • References *
  • Author Index 865
  • Subject Index 891
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