Counterfeiting Shakespeare: Evidence, Authorship, and John Ford's Funerall Elegye

By Brian Vickers | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II
Verbal parallels between 'A Funerall Elegye'
and Ford's poems

VERSE LINES BEGINNING WITH A PRESENT PARTICIPLE

'Fames Memoriall'
27. Planting hir gorgeous throne upon the crest
34. Astonishing the chaffe of pampered men
54. Venting concealed virtue now apparent
62. Diving into the depth of hidden art
67. Adding within our hearts historiall
72. Raising your deeds to fames which never end
82. Inlarging still his theame and scope to say
103. Alotting in his urne nobility
116. Applying with industrious diligence
122. Inritching his ritche knowledge doth it sute
238. Containing acts, such acts conceit do passe
291. Cloking your soules in sins obscurity
334. Reviving dulnesse of a wit forlorne
472. Presenting conquests of well mastred spight
656. Deluding types of honour as accurst
699. Making large statues to honorifie
718. Inriching Brittayn with this happy gaine
768. Keeping Contempt of virtue in subjection
1143. Contemplating the joyes of heavens content
1146. Thirsting to be immortall hence he went
1151. Pittying the sorrow which our danger crowds

'A Funerall Elegye'
15. Remembring what he was, with comfort then
47. Despising chiefly, men in fortunes wrackt

-484-

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