Counterfeiting Shakespeare: Evidence, Authorship, and John Ford's Funerall Elegye

By Brian Vickers | Go to book overview

APPENDIX III
Establishing Ford's canon

As explained in chapter 8, in order to provide the fullest possible archive of John Ford's writings, I have drawn not only on the seven plays canonically ascribed to him – Love's Sacrifice, Perkin Warbeck, The Broken Heart, The Fancies, Chaste and Noble, The Lady's Trial, The Lover's Melancholy, and 'tis Pity She's a Whore – but also on two plays written by him alone, The Queen and The Laws of Candy, and five extant co-authored plays:The Witch of Edmonton (with Dekker and Rowley), The Spanish Gypsy, The Sun's Darling, The Welsh Ambassador (all three with Dekker), and The Fair Maid of the Inn (with Massinger and Webster). 1 It seems all the more urgent to set out the case for his participation in these co-authored plays since the relevant scholarship has been lost from view in recent discussions of his work. In the authoritative-seeming Dictionary of Literary Biography Paul Cantor dismissed 'scholars [who] have tried to ascribe to Ford works credited to other playwrights, such as The Spanish Gypsy, published originally as a work by Middleton and Rowley', 2 not disclosing that those scholars were among the leading authorities in the field, nor discussing the criteria they used. Cantor never mentioned The Laws of Candy, apparently unaware of the certain identification of Ford's hand in it, and observed dismissively that his authorship of The Queen has been claimed 'on the basis of a few verbal parallels and a general resemblance to the situation in a number of Ford's plays', adding: 'One wonders why anyone would go out of his way to include the play in the Ford canon: it adds nothing to our understanding of his art or to our appreciation of his skill or range as a playwright' (Cantor 1987, p. 105). This comment betrays a total failure to understand the rationale of authorship studies. The useful collection, John Ford. Critical Re-Visions (Neill 1988), sadly ignores Ford's co-authored plays, as well as The Laws of Candy and The Queen, and none of these works (with the exception of The Witch of Edmonton) is covered in a recent survey of scholarship up to 1989. 3

-494-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Counterfeiting Shakespeare: Evidence, Authorship, and John Ford's Funerall Elegye
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 568

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.