Postmortem: New Evidence in the Case of Sacco and Vanzetti

By William Young; David E. Kaiser | Go to book overview

Preface

This book has a curious history. The late William Young of Wellesley, Massachusetts, was a highly successful rare book and art dealer and the editor of the Dictionary of American Artists, Painters, and Sculptors. His success gave him ample time to pursue other interests. In 1977 I was introduced to him by Steve Flink, a mutual friend staying at his house for a weekend. Most of the conversation that day dealt with tennis, a passion we all shared. Then, as I was leaving, I noticed on his bookshelf the five thick volumes of the record of the trial of Sacco and Vanzetti. Having read something about the case myself, I asked him if he was interested in it.

I had stumbled upon a man who had spent more than ten years researching every aspect of the case. His knowledge far outstripped mine, and his conclusions were, to say the least, surprising. A few weeks later he secured a copy of the Massachusetts State Police files released after the fiftieth anniversary of the execution of Sacco and Vanzetti, and began a new phase of his research. We rapidly became friends, and I became the sounding board for his new conclusions. He began preparing a manuscript embodying his findings, and we sometimes spoke about the possibility of working on it together. But having just begun a career as a university history teacher I was too busy with other projects, and nothing ever came of this idea. He eventually completed a manuscript but recognized that it was not in finished form.

In January 1980 William Young, then fifty-two years old, was stricken with terminal cancer. I found him in remarkably good spirits on my last visit to him. We agreed that I would take the manuscript and the documentation he had collected and try to put it into publishable form. He died in April 1980. My work on the manuscript received a tremendous boost when my new employer, the History and Philosophy Department of Carnegie-Mellon University, provided funding for more research. With the help of Michael Levitin and Catherine Hustead, I developed a great deal of new material and broadened the scope of the manuscript. I must thank Mrs. Erika Chadbourne of the Harvard Law School Library, the staff of the Boston Public Library, Donald Smith and Keith Halsey of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Susan Falb of the National Archives for their help in leading me to many important documents on the case. I must also thank Catherine Casey of the Massachusetts Supreme

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Postmortem: New Evidence in the Case of Sacco and Vanzetti
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Postmortem - New Evidence in the Case of Sacco and Vanzetti *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • 1 - Introduction *
  • 2 - Anarchism and the Arrests *
  • 3 - Vanzetti's Plymouth Trial *
  • 4 - The Prosecution *
  • 5 - The Identification Testimony *
  • 6 - The Defendants *
  • 7 - The Alibis *
  • 8 - Vanzetti's Gun *
  • 9 - Bullet III *
  • 10 - How the Frame Occurred *
  • 11 - The Feds *
  • 12 - Alternative Theories *
  • 13 - Conclusion *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.