John Updike and the Cold War: Drawing the Iron Curtain

By D. Quentin Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I WOULD LIKE TO THANK Michael Meyer, Brenda Murphy, and Veronica Makowsky, all from the University of Connecticut, who guided me through the dissertation that led to this book with a tremendous amount of patience, insight, and encouragement. I would especially like to thank my wife, Julie Nash, who has read virtually every draft and revision and offered support and valuable criticism.

Thanks also to the research, scholarship, and creativity committee at Gustavus Adolphus College for providing me with a grant to study Updike's papers at the Houghton Library during the summer of 1997.I would also like to thank two research assistants from Gustavus, Kaethe Schwehn and Kate Krueger, who helped me track down sources and who kept my work in order. I am grateful to Michael Ronayne, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Suffolk University, for helping to pay the permissions costs of Updike's publications.

I also want to thank Betty Falsey at the Houghton Library at Harvard for helping me with Updike's manuscripts and Leslie Morris for providing permission to quote from those sources.

Finally, I would like to thank John Updike for responding thoroughly, quickly, and generously to my questions over the years and for allowing me to quote from his papers at the Houghton.

-ix-

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John Updike and the Cold War: Drawing the Iron Curtain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Note on Citation xi
  • John Updike and the Cold War *
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Knowledge of an Immense Catastrophe 15
  • 2 - Zero-Sum Marriages, Global Games 38
  • 3 - Vietnam and the Politics of Undovishness 72
  • 4 - Seeing How the Other Half Lives 106
  • 5 - A Reason to Get Up in the Morning 145
  • Conclusion - End of Time or Afterlife? 177
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
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