Diamonds and Coral: Anglo-Dutch Jews and Eighteenth-Century Trade

By Gedalia Yogev | Go to book overview

Foreword

The study of Jewish economic history in modem times involves a number of unique problems which the economic historian does not usually have to tackle. Although in the eighteenth century Jews were still subject to various disabilities, even in tolerant countries like England and Holland, they did not constitute a clear-cut juridicial entity, as they had done in the Middle Ages. There is therefore very little documentation referring specifically to the economic activities of Jews, and the facts have to be gathered laboriously from a very great number of documents belonging to a variety of archival series and collections of papers of a general character, which can be assumed, a priori, to contain, among much else, information relating to Jewish economic activities.

This, however, is not the main problem confronting the student of Jewish economic history. A meticulous and systematic search is liable to uncover a large amount of relevant information; but even at this stage we still have to face the question: what does it all amount to? Does it really enable us to reconstruct a coherent and reliable picture and to draw reasonably safe conclusions? After all, a mere collection of anecdotes is hardly worth the trouble involved in collecting them. In view of the inevitable paucity of statistical data, this is a very dangerous pitfall which students of Jewish economic history have not always been able to avoid.

In the present book an attempt is made to tackle the problem in a somewhat unconventional manner by getting to grips with the subject at three different levels, represented by the three sections into which the book is divided.

The first part is a general survey, based to a large degree on information gathered from a considerable number of Chancery and, to a lesser extent, Exchequer cases, relating to disputes involving commercial activities of English Jews. A great amount of information can be gleaned, not only from the arguments advanced by the litigants; often the attached appendices, including copies of correspondence, contracts and balance-sheets, are

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diamonds and Coral: Anglo-Dutch Jews and Eighteenth-Century Trade
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.