The Romance of Origins: Language and Sexual Difference in Middle English Literature

By Gayle Margherita | Go to book overview

Appendix

The lyrics reproduced here are taken from Middle English Lyrics, selected and edited by Maxwell S. Luria and Richard L. Hoffman ( New York: Norton, 1974). Titles are borrowed from The Harley Lyrics, ed. G. L. Brook ( Manchester: Manchester University Press, 4th ed. 1968). Translations are my own.


Annot and John

Ichot a burde in a bour ase beryl so bright,
Ase saphyr in selver semly on sight,
Ase iaspe the gentil that lemeth with light,
Ase gernet in golde and ruby well right;
Ase onycle he is on iholden on hight,
Ase diamaund the dere in day when he is dight;
He is coral icud with cayser and knight;
ase emeraude amorewen this may haveth might.
The might of the margarite haveth this may mere;
For charbocle ich hire ches by chin and by chere.

Hire rode is ase rose that red is on ris;
With lilie-white leres lossum he is;
The primerole he passeth, the perwenke of pris,
With alisaundre thareto, ache and anis.
Cointe ase columbine such hire cunde is,
Glad under gore in gro and in gris;
He is blosme opon bleo, brightest under bis,
With celydoine and sauge, as thou thyself sis.
That sight upon that semly, to bliss he is broght;
He is solsecle: to sauve is forsoght.

He is papeiay in pyn that beteth me my bale;
To trewe tortle in a tour I telle thee my tale;
He is thrustle thriven in thro that singeth in sale,

-163-

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The Romance of Origins: Language and Sexual Difference in Middle English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction: the Psychic Life of the Past 1
  • 1. Margery Kempe and the Pathology of Writing 15
  • 2. Body and Metaphor in the Middle English Juliana 43
  • 3 - Women and Riot in the Harley Lyrics 62
  • 4. Originary Fantasies and Chaucer's Book of the Duchess 82
  • 5. Historicity, Femininity, and Chaucer's Troilus 100
  • 6. Father Aeneas or Morgan the Goddess 129
  • Afterword: the Medieval Thing 153
  • Appendix 163
  • Notes 179
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 211
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