The Romance of Origins: Language and Sexual Difference in Middle English Literature

By Gayle Margherita | Go to book overview

Notes
Preface
1. Connie Willis, Doomsday Book ( New York: Bantam, 1992).
2. Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious: Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act ( Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1981), 9. Jameson's statement is discussed in detail by Geoff Bennington, "Demanding History," in Post-Structuralism and the Question of Histoty, ed. Derek Attridge, Geoff Bennington, and Robert Young ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), 20-21.
3. Lee Patterson, ed., Literary Practice and Social Change in Britain 1380-1530 ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990), 1.
4. David Aers, Community, Gender, and Individual Identity: English Writing 1360-1430 ( London: Routledge, 1988), 6, 10.
Introduction
1. D. W. Robertson, A Preface to Chaucer ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962), 3.
2. There is, of course, a long tradition linking historical and aesthetic philosophy. Hegel's somewhat unwieldy Aesthetics is perhaps the best-known work in this genre; other, more contemporary examples include Theodor W. Adorno Aesthetic Theory and Terry Eagleton recent book, The Ideology of the Aesthetic ( Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, 1990).
3. See Lee Patterson, Negotiating the Past: The Historical Understanding of Medieval Literature ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1987), and his introduction to the historicist anthology Literary Practice and Social Change in Britain, 1380- 1530.
4. The so-called "fort-da game" is discussed in Beyond the Pleasure Principle: The Standard Edition of the Complete Works of Sigmund Freud, ed. James Strachey and trans. James Strachey et al. ( London: Hogarth, 1953-74.), vol. 18. All references to the Standard Edition will hereafter be cited as SE.
5. Jacques Lacan, "The Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason Since Freud," in Écrits: A Selection, trans. Alan Sheridan ( New York: Norton, 1977), 154.
6. Writing about Juliet Mitchell book Psychoanalysis and Feminism, Jane Gallop notes the problematic status of the conjunction in this particular context:

This "and" bridges the gap between two combatants: it runs back and forth holding its white flag as high as possible. Although, of the two, feminism has

-179-

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The Romance of Origins: Language and Sexual Difference in Middle English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction: the Psychic Life of the Past 1
  • 1. Margery Kempe and the Pathology of Writing 15
  • 2. Body and Metaphor in the Middle English Juliana 43
  • 3 - Women and Riot in the Harley Lyrics 62
  • 4. Originary Fantasies and Chaucer's Book of the Duchess 82
  • 5. Historicity, Femininity, and Chaucer's Troilus 100
  • 6. Father Aeneas or Morgan the Goddess 129
  • Afterword: the Medieval Thing 153
  • Appendix 163
  • Notes 179
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 211
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