The Missing Spanish Creoles: Recovering the Birth of Plantation Contact Languages

By John H. McWhorter | Go to book overview

3
The Atlantic
English-Based Creoles

Sisters Under the Skin

3.1 INTRODUCTION

The modus operandi in tracing the history of the Atlantic English-based creoles (henceforth AECs)1 is to treat each major creole as a local dlevelopment within its own colony. Mufwene (1992: 161) concludes that “the 1720–1740 period is most likely the time Gullah must have started as a creole”; Bickerton (1994b) considers Sranan to have emerged in Suriname in 1690; and so on.

Yet at the same time, it is common knowledge among creolists that the Anglophone Caribbean (other than Suriname) is essentially “a single speech community” (Holm 1989: 446). Intelligibility between many of the creoles is considerable, with speakers from various islands casually referring to the creoles as varieties of a single “patois. ” Literary sources demonstrate this in cases such as an edition of the poem “Buddy Quow, ” written in what its author called “Gullah-Jamaican dialect” (Cassidy 1994: 16). Even creolophone specialists, such as Winford (1985), treat most of them (again, minus the Suriname varieties) as a general “Caribbean English Creole” (CEC) to no complaint.

The question, then, is how plausible it could be that each, or Even many, of these creoles arose independently if today they are varieties of the same language. In response to this, over the decades there have been a number of scholars who have argued that the English-based creoles of the Caribbean are traceable to a single English-based ancestor (Cassidy 1980, 1986; Carter

____________________
1
Atlantic English-based Creole (AEC) refers to the English-based creoles of the Caribbean, Central America, and South America, as well as the related creoles of West Africa (Krio, Ghanaian Pidgin English, Nigerian Pidgin English, Cameroonian Pidgin English, etc.).

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Missing Spanish Creoles: Recovering the Birth of Plantation Contact Languages
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Where Are the Spanish Creoles? 6
  • 3 - Sisters Under the Skin 41
  • 4 - Afrogenesis and the Atlantic English-Based Creoles 99
  • 5 - The French-Based Creoles 146
  • 6 - Synthesis 195
  • 7 - Conclusion 224
  • References 243
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 281

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.